Noise News for Week of May 23, 1999


Consultants for Warwick, Rhode Island's T.F. Green Airport Recommend Buying Homes as Most Cost-Effective Way to Reduce Noise Exposure to Residents

PUBLICATION: The Associated Press State & Local Wire
DATE: May 26, 1999
SECTION: State and Regional
DATELINE: Warwick, Rhode Island
ACTIVISTS, INDIVIDUALS, AND GROUPS MENTIONED: Landrum & Brown, noise consulting firm

The Associated Press reports that consultants for Rhode Island's Airport Corp. have recommended the purchase of at least 135 homes who are exposed to 70 dB or more of noise from T.F. Green Airport over a 24-hour period. The recommendation came after many homes had already been soundproofed, and options such as extending a secondary runway were explored.

The story goes on to explain that an air-traffic increase at T.F. Green had already necessitated the soundproofing of many homes with a cost to federal taxpayers of $25,000 per house. The $20-million buyout was one of several options considered, including a $100-million to $300-million extension to a secondary runway; pilots were unwilling to use the secondary runway at its present length. The entire noise study will be voted on by the Airport Corporation's directors before being sent to the FAA for final approval next month.

The Associated Press also notes that Landrum & Brown, the consulting firm, is pushing for a $50,000 study to determine whether the expensive runway extension project might be additionally justified for operational reasons.

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Oceana Naval Base Near Virginia Beach Reports Noise Complaint Increase, Blames Added Squadrons, Weather and Repairs

PUBLICATION: The Virginian-Pilot
DATE: May 25, 1999
SECTION: Local, Pg. B1
BYLINE: by Louis Hansen
DATELINE: Virginia Beach, Virginia

The Virginian-Pilot reports that Oceana Naval Air Station saw a 30 percent spike in aircraft noise complaints last month. Normally the base receives about 50 complaints each month, but with several squadrons of loud jets relocating from Florida and unpredictable weather redirecting flight paths, noise has increased.

The article goes on, noting that 4 squadrons (about 48 planes) of supersonic F/A-18 Hornets have already arrived, and about 6 more squadrons (about 108 planes) are scheduled to arrive this summer. Hornets are much louder than the F-14s that commonly fly in the area. A community group, Citizens Concerned About Jet Noise, has monitored the increase in noise, and remains active though a suit they filed against the Navy was dismissed last week. Weather patterns have also shifted takeoffs and landings to more disruptive runways that are usually not used often.

The article also notes that the base plans to construct a "hush house" which would be a soundproof structure in which to test jet engines. This month, repairs have necessitated many of these tests, and currently they are conducted outdoors. The base says it reviews and investigates every complaint, calling them "the finger on the pulse of the community."

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Ontario's Mississauga East Election Issues Include Increased Noise from a New Runway at Pearson International

PUBLICATION: The Toronto Star
DATE: May 27, 1999
SECTION: News
BYLINE: Donovan Vincent
DATELINE: Mississauga, Ontario
ACTIVISTS, INDIVIDUALS, AND GROUPS MENTIONED: Carl DeFaria, Ontario provincial riding candidate.

The Toronto Star reports that the candidates in the provincial riding in Mississauga East, Ontario are going head to head on the issues, including airport noise; noise-related complaints have doubled since 1997 when a new runway was introduced at Pearson International Airport.

The Star goes on to report that the airport has logged 7,458 complaints this year, compared to 3,853 in 1997 and 1,702 in 1996. The number of takeoffs has increased to 72 each hour, while landings have increased to 58. Previously unaffected neighborhoods are now having to deal with airplane noise. Candidate Carl DeFaria has worked with concerned local residents in presenting a petition to Queen's Park.

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New Orleans International Airport's Noise Consultants Begin Study, Hold First in Series of Public Hearings

PUBLICATION: The Times-Picayune
DATE: May 26, 1999
SECTION: Metro; Pg. B1
BYLINE: by Matt Scallan
DATELINE: Kenner, Louisiana

The Times-Picayune reports that Barnard Dunkelberg and Associates, a noise consulting firm for the New Orleans International Airport held the first in a new series of public hearings. The firm has begun their 15-month study which will evaluate the effect of airport noise on neighborhoods in nearby Kenner, Louisiana. Noise monitoring sites have been chosen, but which will be used on any day will remain secret.

The article goes on to say that the study will map out noise contour lines around the airport where airport noise exceeds 65 dB per day. A lawsuit in the 1980s filed against the airport by residents resulted in development of noise contour lines, and this previous study will be useful for comparison reasons. Some neighbors have voluntarily allowed their yards to be used for monitoring. The reason for keeping monitoring locations secret is "concern that airlines or the control tower would divert flights away from the monitors, or that neighbors would attempt to make things noisier."

The story continues, noting that the purchase of homes in the noisiest flight paths, together with newer, quieter airplanes has reduced many resident's exposure to noise. Many residents who were not 'bought out' wish they were, feeling their property values are diminished as well.

The article also notes that city officials tried to gain more control over the airport's noise abatement policies through legislation, but airport officials argued that there is already legal recourse if the airport does not cooperate, and that certain aspects are the sole jurisdiction of federal regulations.

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Proposed Directive in Brussels, Belgium to Set Maximum Noise Levels for Lawn and Garden Appliances; Manufacturer Compliance May be Difficult

PUBLICATION: Times Newspapers Limited
DATE: May 23, 1999
SECTION: Home News
BYLINE: Stephen Bevan and Gabriel Milland
DATELINE: London, England

Times Newspapers Limited reports that a proposed directive in Brussels, Belgium will set limits on how much noise outdoor appliances can make. Manufacturers claim that a reduction of even two decibels could be disastrous for some products. A researcher at Southampton University's Institute of Sound and Vibration Studies said "To remove two decibels you have to remove half the sound energy. That would be quite an engineering achievement."

The article goes on to say that limits would be stringent; the maximum noise level for mowers "with a cutting width of less than 50 cm would be trimmed from 96 decibels to 94..., which could mean some company's entire output being branded unlawful." A representative from Britain's largest garden machinery company said: "If this goes through, we will be wiped out," and other companies maintain that a petrol mower could not meet the standard while cutting lawns effectively. While some say that reducing a mower's speed of operation could lower noise, critics claim that this would only increase the time people used their appliances. Similar legislation has passed recently in other European countries such as Germany and England.

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Stuart, Florida's County Commission Meeting Packed by Witham Field/Martin County Airport Watch Committee Members Demanding Airport Noise Reduction

PUBLICATION: The Stuart News/Port St. Lucie News
DATE: May 26, 1999
SECTION: Local; Pg. B1
BYLINE: Dan Mccue
DATELINE: Stuart, Florida
ACTIVISTS, INDIVIDUALS, AND GROUPS MENTIONED: Janet Gettig, Stuart Florida County Commission Chair

The Stuart News/Port St. Lucie News reports that 100 members of the Witham Field/Martin County Airport Watch packed a County Commission meeting in Stuart, Florida with a list of several demands relating to reduction of airport noise. They claimed that the Commission had basically relinquished control of the airport to the FAA, and was not sufficiently curbing increased air traffic and noise in accordance with their existing limited growth policies. Commission Chairwoman Janet Gettig agreed with their concerns, citing her opposition of several commission actions including recent approval of a new airport lease; she plans to place the issue on the Commission's agenda in the near future.

The article went on to detail the list of demands, which included the exact acreage of the airport to resolve conflicting public numbers, who leases which parts, and copies of correspondence between the county, the FAA, and the Department of Transportation. Finally, they demanded a moratorium on further growth of the airport.

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Fenton, Missouri Board of Aldermen Approved a Bill that Limits Noisy Construction to Roughly Daylight Hours

PUBLICATION: St. Louis Post-Dispatch
DATE: May 27, 1999
SECTION: South Post, Pg. 4
BYLINE: Barb Depalma
DATELINE: Fenton, Missouri

St. Louis Post-Dispatch reports that the Fenton Board of Aldermen has limited the hours that construction companies can create noise to between 7 AM and sunset during the week, and between 8 AM and sunset on Saturdays and Sundays. Construction noise is defined as the work, related vehicular traffic and other noises that emanate from a construction site.

The Post-Dispatch went on to say that extensions can be granted in emergency situations, and in cases where the disturbance is greatly overshadowed by the public benefit of completing a project. During the meeting, an extension was approved at a development from 6 AM to 11 PM; during normal hours, this excavation could take more than a year. An alderman said "We will base the success of this bill on the number and type of complaints we receive."

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Consultants Recommend that Warwick, Rhode Island's T.F. Green Airport Buy Homes Subjected to Most Noise, and Consider Extending Shorter Runway

PUBLICATION: Providence Journal-Bulletin
DATE: May 26, 1999
BYLINE: by Tony Depaul
DATELINE: Warwick, Rhode Island

The Providence Journal-Bulletin reports that Landrum & Brown, noise consultants for Rhode Island's Airport Corporation, recommended the $20 million purchase of at least 135 residences surrounding Warwick's T.F. Green Airport. The residences selected are subjected to at least 65-70 dB of airport noise each day, caused by ever-increasing air traffic at the airport. The $100-300 million extension of a shorter runway, which would redistribute more flights over less populated areas such as an industrial park, was not in the noise consultants report; the consultants did encourage a second look at extending the runway, saying that other benefits other than noise abatement may help to justify the cost. The Corporation's Board of Directors will vote on the proposals and forward them to the FAA for adoption.

The article continues by noting that many of the houses in the proposed buyout have already been soundproofed using federal money at about $25,000 per house. The consultants said this was taken into consideration, but that the higher levels of noise made purchase a better option for "delivering compatibility to noise...."

The story continues, saying that the firm had previously recommended the voluntary use of the shorter runway, but many pilots insisted it was not as safe. The next best option was extension of the runway, and although it is prohibitively expensive based on noise-abatement benefits alone, the firm has recommended a $50,000 study on exploring other benefits that a longer runway would create such as increased safety and efficiency. Extension of the runway may require the buyout of other neighborhoods that were previously receiving less than 70 dB daily.

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Airplanes' Noise Affects Quality of Life in Vero Beach, Florida

PUBLICATION: Press Journal
DATE: May 26, 1999
SECTION: Letters To The Editor; Pg. A12
BYLINE: William Starkey
DATELINE: Vero Beach, Florida

Anyone remember the introduction to the "Fantasy Island" TV show?

I, for one, am curious as to why our skies sound like the Battle of Britain (World War II) most weekdays. Vero Beach, our community, is extolled as one of the best small enclaves in the United States with its abundance of hundreds of species of birds and other wild life.

We, however, experience an aerial noise level quite unparalleled for a community our size. While it is beneficial to have solid businesses here, the question must be asked, why must they disturb the quality of life?

I believe that the air noise is a direct consequence of "open pipes" (that is lack of mufflers or inadequate muffler systems) on airplanes. A noise -abatement effort on behalf of the owners of said aircraft may diminish the performance of the aircraft, yet it will significantly enhance the quality of life in our eco-friendly community.

Thoughts? Anyone?

William Starkey

Vero Beach

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Noise: Nuisance Or Health Hazard?

PUBLICATION: The New York Times
DATE: May 23, 1999
SECTION: Section 11; Page 9; Column 6; Real Estate Desk
DATELINE: New York City

The New York Times printed the following letter to the Editor arguing that noise is a pollutant and not just a nuisance.

Regarding "Is There a Law on Carpeting?" Q & A, May 16 , the trouble lies not so much with inconsiderate neighbors who don't cover their floors with the sound-absorbent material required by rental leases and co-op/condo house rules as with the failure of landlords, co-op/condo boards and managing agents, real estate lawyers and housing court judges to recognize that noise pollution is at least as damaging to health as air pollution. Even low-level audio irritants, like the click-click of heels on a bare or tiled floor, can cause stress to the downstairs neighbor, and not only in the middle of the night as experienced by the letter writer.

For the real estate lawyer who answered the question to call such thoughtless and also illegal auditory invasion of a neighbor's apartment a "nuisance problem" tends to discount all the medical research that finds it to be a significant health hazard.

Many New Yorkers feel it's the No. 1 cause of stress and distress in multiple-dwelling life. It may well be the leading cause of disputes between neighbors, which have been known to result in violence. But mostly it's the stress-producing ill-will incurred in the place we hope to find peace. BETTE DEWING Manhattan

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Irvine, California's City Council to Sue Against Demonstration of Commercial Jet Noise at El Toro Military Base on Environmental Grounds

PUBLICATION: Orange County Register
DATE: May 26, 1999
SECTION: Metro; Pg. B01
BYLINE: Mary Ann Milbourn
DATELINE: Irvine, California

The Orange County Register reports that Irvine, California will sue the County to stop a two-day demonstration of commercial jet noise at El Toro military base. The demonstration is intended to give residents a taste of how noisy it may be if the base is converted into a commercial airport. Eight different kinds of planes will land and take off up to five times each. Also, ten noise monitors will be set up, although data collected over only two days will not be scientifically significant.

The article goes on to note that other municipalities and organizations concerned with the test had decided it was not worth fighting. A councilman acknowledged that the lawsuit is a long shot, but that the council was morally required to act; at least one flight path to be used in the test was dangerous enough that the military to stop using it after a 1965 crash. A spokeswoman from the county says that their consultants, recommended by the pilots union, sees the airport as perfectly safe.

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Government Officials in West Allis, Wisconsin are Ready to Demand Less Tire-Testing Noise from State Fair Auto-Racing Oval in Response to Increasing Resident Complaints

PUBLICATION: Milwaukee Journal Sentinel
DATE: May 23, 1999
SECTION: News Pg. 1
BYLINE: Fran Bauer
DATELINE: West Allis, Wisconsin

The Milwaukee Journal-Sentinel reports that the mayor, along with several House Representatives in West Allis, Wisconsin, are ready to demand that the State Fair "Milwaukee Mile" auto-racing oval limit the noise they produce. Noise has been more prevalent due to more frequent in pre-race tire testing and increasing use by an auto-racing school. Residents are very upset and complaining more frequently, but track officials continue to make improvements to the track to draw even more races there.

The article continues, noting that contract negotiations for the track are handled by the state Department of Administration, which is based 100 miles away from any noise-related problems. Government officials want a West Allis resident on the committee, to give the community a voice. According to West Allis' mayor, current negotiations with the park operator involving a new grandstand do not take into account the effects of noise on neighbors. The negotiations deal with the contract, written in 1992, that will be 'automatically renewed' every seven years for 28 years. Although the chairman of the fair park board acknowledges the issue of tire-testing noise, he says they would be difficult to eliminate because "they're a revenue generator [and an] important part of the racing program."

The paper goes on to say that Wisconsin's Governor earmarked $20 million of state bonds for improvements at the park, calling for the new grandstand and bleacher seating to attract more races to the track. In addition, the fair park board agreed to hire experts to "design cutting-edge attractions to make the fairgrounds a year-round entertainment center."

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Overwhelming Majority of 50 Residents at Upper Saucon, Pennsylvania Town Board Meeting Oppose a Proposed Noise Ordinance to Restrict Firearm Discharge

PUBLICATION: The Morning Call
DATE: May 27, 1999
SECTION: Local/Region, Pg. B4
BYLINE: Zackie Due
DATELINE: Upper Saucon, Pennsylvania
ACTIVISTS, INDIVIDUALS, AND GROUPS MENTIONED: Peter Kuhlmann, campaign organizer

The Morning Call reports that only three of more than 50 residents at a recent Upper Saucon, PA Town Board meeting supported a proposed ordinance to enforce noise levels; the ordinance would restrict shooting ranges to industrial zones.

According to the paper, supervisors opened the discussion by saying that "the discharge of firearms is an activity which involves heightened considerations of both safety and noise pollution," and that it must be regulated where safety or noise pollution could be an issue. Exemptions are included for legitimate pursuit of game during hunting season, as well as practice two weeks before hunting season on one's own property. Among the few supporters at the meeting was Peter Kuhlmann, head of the campaign in support of the ordinance.

The paper reports that many citizens were concerned that the ordinance would prevent the firing of a gun almost anywhere in town. "I'm tired of new people moving in here and expecting us to change our lives," said resident Rick Nelson. "I've shot in my back yard all my life and I will continue to do it whether this ordinance is passed or not."

The Morning Call went on to say that while the ordinance sets decibel limits for different zones in the town, many common household tools and equipment are granted daytime exemptions, along with street repair, farm vehicles, public roads, railroad and aircraft, and authorized public events.

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Board of Lehigh and Northampton Airport, Near Allentown, Pennsylvania Compromises to Begin Noise Monitoring Program Before Senate Funding Passes

PUBLICATION: The Morning Call
DATE: May 26, 1999
SECTION: Local/Region, Pg. B3
BYLINE: Dan Hartzell; The Morning Call
DATELINE: Allentown, Pennsylvania

The Morning Call reports that after heated debate, a compromise to begin a noise-monitoring program was reached at the Lehigh and Northampton Airport near Allentown, Pennsylvania. One grant meant to fund the program had been eaten up by other projects, and a second federal grant is still pending in the Senate. To avoid further delays, the Authority agreed to fund the design stages until the grant came through; then, those costs could be reimbursed and the necessary equipment could be purchased.

The article continues, highlighting board member Walter Lysaght who believes that the administration has been dragging its feet on noise issues for seven years, and "has no interest in abating noise." Lysaght agreed to the compromise plan, but soon after refused to support the use of a $1 million federal grant to soundproof 25 of the 200 homes most disrupted by the airport's flight paths. "I call it the 'Fleecing of America' program," he said after the meeting. "A million dollars to soundproof 25 homes ... when the authority has done nothing to reduce noise." The soundproofing project was approved in the end.

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Las Vegas, Nevada Air Tour Operators Upset Over Proposed National Park Service Rule To Limit Noise to Levels Below Ambient Sounds

PUBLICATION: Las Vegas Review-Journal
DATE: May 26, 1999
SECTION: B; Pg. 1B
BYLINE: Christine Dorsey
DATELINE: Washington, D.C.

The Las Vegas Review-Journal reports that Nevada's air tour industry believes a new rule proposed by the National Park Service could destroy their industry by limiting noise levels for Grand Canyon National Park. The rule would limit non-natural noise to 8 dB below natural sounds, although a federal court ruled that 3 dB above natural sounds would be sufficient; the park has been divided into different sound regions, so the natural noise limit would range between 20 and 40 dBs, depending on the location within the park.

The story went on to mention a recent hearing on Capitol Hill, where aviators, industry officials, and Nevada legislators argued that the rule would soon end all air tours over the canyon and hurt Nevada's economy; of 800,000 tourists who tour the canyon by air, 500,000 hire Nevada operators, contributing about $374.8 million to the Southern Nevada economy. Nevada Republican Jim Gibbons called the rule an 'elitist, nonsensical' plan. One representative demonstrated that even in the hearing room with no talking, sound levels could reach 34 dBs in an attempt to show that the noise limits were unreasonably low.

The article continued, mentioning that only 78 tourists out of 9 million in the last two years have complained about noise. In addition, operators asserted that if tours were forced out of the innermost two-thirds of the park, tours would disturb more people; this could in turn increase complaints, and force air tours out of the park entirely.

The article said that the goal of the plan, according to the park service, is to protect the natural sounds of the river, animals, and wind. In 1990, Congress passed a law requiring the park service to restore natural quiet to the park, and the service has been working with the FAA to establish limits for aircraft. In 1994, a report was released that evaluated noise in the park.

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Irvine, California's city council Sues County Over Planned Jet Noise Test at El Toro Marine Base, Insisting on Environmental Review

PUBLICATION: Los Angeles Times
DATE: May 26, 1999
SECTION: Metro; Part B; Page 4; Metro Desk
BYLINE: Jean O. Pasco and David Reyes
DATELINE: Irvine, California

The Los Angeles Times reports that the Irvine, California's City Council will sue the County over a planned test of commercial jet noise at El Toro Marine base. The council wants the county to obtain an environmental review, and consider public safety issues involved, before the two-day test, during which noise from 27 takeoffs and landings will be recorded using 10 noise monitors. The study is intended to determine whether commercial jets can use the facility without excessive disturbance of the surrounding residential communities. The County supervisors, military and federal regulators have all approved the test, saying an environmental study is not needed.

The story goes on to say that the county is concerned with obtaining an interim lease to allow facilities such as the golf course, horse stables, and swimming pool to be opened to public use when Marines leave the base in July. Reasons for keeping the base open include community benefit as well as avoiding expensive 'restart' costs if upkeep is neglected.

The article continues by saying that while northern takeoffs and landings would not affect residences as much, an upward sloped runway and terrain to the north makes use of the northern runway more risky; the military ceased use of the northern runway for departures after a 1965 crash. The county maintains that none of the airlines involved in the tests are concerned, and that the runway will be leveled during construction of the airport.

The article also mentions the anti-airport El Toro Reuse Planning Authority, which is composed of eight cities in Orange County. They have promised to spend $4.5 million this year to fight any aviation-related uses of the base.

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Wayne, Maine Public Hearings Propose an Ordinance Forbidding Personal Water Craft on Local Ponds and a Change in How Noise from Alleged Noise Ordinance Violators is Measured

PUBLICATION: Kennebec Journal
DATE: May 27, 1999
SECTION: Local; Pg. B1
BYLINE: by Tom Frey
DATELINE: Wayne, Maine

Kennebec Journal reports on a series of Wayne, Maine public hearings dealing with an ordinance to ban personal water craft on local ponds, and a change in measuring noise ordinance violations.

The journal said there was support for a new ordinance that would ban the use of personal water craft on Berry, Dexter and Wilson ponds. Residents were upset over the sediments that were disturbed by the water craft, which were first used on the ponds last year. The proposals will be sent on to the State for consideration.

The paper also reports on a proposed change to an existing noise ordinance. Instead of measuring noise 500 feet from the property line of the alleged noise offense, as is presently done, officials would measure the distance from the noise source to decide if there is a violation.

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Public Library Board in Fishers, Indiana OKs New Policy for Reducing Noise in Library and Suspending Privileges for Uncooperative Patrons

PUBLICATION: The Indianapolis Star
DATE: May 26, 1999
SECTION: Metro North; Pg. N04
BYLINE: Susan H. Miller; Correspondent
DATELINE: Fishers, Indiana

The Indianapolis Star reports that the Fishers, Indiana Public Library Board approved a new policy to deal with increasing noise-related complaints in their two branches. Problems have included parents yelling to their children, higher numbers of cell phone and pager disruptions, and disruptively loud conversations. The policy establishes a procedure of issuing a written or verbal warning.

The article continues, saying that some patrons resent being told how to behave in a taxpayer-funded facility. If someone does become hostile, they will first be warned that their behavior is unacceptable and may jeopardize their library privileges; if hostility continues, the person will be asked to leave and will forfeit their privileges. Staff are encouraged to call the police if the patron is out of hand.

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Greensboro, North Carolina's Piedmont Triad International Airport Remains the Choice for Federal Express Hub

PUBLICATION: High Point Enterprise
DATE: May 26, 1999
BYLINE: by Paul B. Johnson
DATELINE: Greensnboro, North Carolina
ACTIVISTS, INDIVIDUALS, AND GROUPS MENTIONED: Chris Peeler, President of Piedmont Quality of Life

High Point Enterprise reports that FedEx intends to go through with the $3 million hub project at Greensboro, North Carolina's Piedmont Triad International Airport (PTIA). Five other Carolina airports were in the running, but most seem to have accepted that PTIA has won; Charlotte/Douglas International Airport, in the preliminary phases of constructing a cargo complex, says they would still be interested, if the deal fell through for any reason. FedEx picked PTIA thirteen months ago, and remains firm in its decision despite community opposition.

The article continues, noting that a consultant for the Greensboro Area Chamber of Commerce said it is "mindful that we have to complete the process and have an alignment that works for FedEx and the facility they need.... These projects are highly coveted, and we need to keep on the straight course." Meanwhile, the Piedmont Quality of Life group opposes the hub on the grounds that it is inappropriate for a highly-developed residential area since cargo planes landing at odd hours would disrupt communities. Officials with the airport and with FedEx have promised to take all measures possible to limit the effects of additional noise.

The article also mentions the FAA's examination of noise and other issues as part of an environmental impact statement, and should release a decision in about a year. The designs require a parallel runway, which would give PTIA three runways in all.

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Noise Control Officers in Montreal Outfitted to Monitor Noise of All Types

PUBLICATION: The Gazette
DATE: May 24, 1999
SECTION: News; A1 / Front
BYLINE: Eric Siblin
DATELINE: Montreal, Quebec

The Gazette reports on Montreal's Noise Control Officers, and the problems that their urban counterparts everywhere face. This quote-heavy article is a humorous, literary take on urban noise. Montreal itself forbids construction noise between 7 PM and 7 AM. The city has a noise department to deal with relatively constant sounds (like air conditioners, ventilation systems, etc).

The article goes on to discuss the noise inspectors, who use a $25,000 sonometer, and for long-duration measurements a van outfitted with microphone booms, to measure sound at the place of disturbance. Officers often have to "play detective to figure out exactly what the noise is," sometimes unplugging appliances or shooing pets. The daytime outdoor maximum for the city is 60 dB, while at night it is 50; measured from inside, 45 is the day limit, going down to 40 at night and 38 after 11. The 'hum' of the city can get up to 40 dB even in rural locations outside the city, while it's around 20 in the truly rural country. Montreal's noise department can slap transgressors with fines starting at $100 and going as high as $1,000, double for companies.

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Queens Representative Hails Increase of Federal Funds for Reducing Airplane Noise

PUBLICATION: Daily News
DATE: May 25, 1999
SECTION: Suburban; Pg. 6
DATELINE: New York City

The Daily News reports that the House has passed a legislative amendment designating $10 million per year for three years to reduce airplane noise. The money will go to NASA's aircraft noise reduction research, representing a 44% increase in current funding.

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Glendale, California's City Council Voted to Support a Proposed Curfew on Burbank Airport Night Flights

PUBLICATION: The Daily News of Los Angeles
DATE: May 26, 1999
SECTION: News, Pg. N3
BYLINE: Lee Condon
DATELINE: Glendale, California
ACTIVISTS, INDIVIDUALS, AND GROUPS MENTIONED: Gus Gomez, Rafi Manoukian, and David Weaver, Glendale city councilmen

The Daily News of Los Angeles reports that the Glendale, California city council voted to support a curfew on night flights at Burbank airport. For at least four years, Glendale's city council had been against the curfew, but with two new council members the council has come to side with the other members of the Burbank-Glendale-Pasadena Airport Authority. The airport had already applied to the FAA for the curfew, and so the vote serves more to identify Glendale as a new ally in the city of Burbank's battle against unrestricted airport expansion and excessive noise.

The article goes on to say that the previous council was in favor of expansion in order to maintain a good relationship with the airlines. This stance contributed to four years of staled mediations. Two new council members were elected in March, and they joined two other councilmen to support the curfew in the 4-1 vote. The Mayor remained opposed, believing "it's none of our business to interfere and make judgments about what's going on at the airport."

The report continues on, noting that Burbank, Glendale, and Pasadena each have three appointees to the Burbank-Glendale-Pasadena Airport Authority. The council also put Glendale's "pro-expansion airport commissioners on notice that they will be removed if real progress is not made in ending the stalemate over Burbank Airport expansion."

In addition, the report addresses a new, revised airport expansion proposal that the Airport Authority submitted to the city of Burbank; the proposal had originally asked for expansion from 14 to 19 gates immediately, but the new version asks for 16 gates, with the option to expand to 19 by 2010. A councilman said he suspects that the compromise came partly from the mention of potentially removing commissioners. The Burbank city council will approve the project if the advantages outweight the negative effects of noise, air pollution, and traffic, and safety hazards. Burbank city officials are pleased with the new proposal, but would not endorse it before it went through the official approval process.

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California and the federal government will pay residents in Burbank, California who live under Burbank Airport flight paths to noise-proof their homes

PUBLICATION: The Daily News of Los Angeles: Glendale/Burbank Edition
DATE: May 27, 1999
SECTION: News, Pg. N3
BYLINE: City News Service
DATELINE: Burbank, California

The Daily News of Los Angeles: Glendale/Burbank Edition reports that the state Senate has designated $400,000, together with $1.6 million from the federal government, to help residents affected by noise from Burbank Airport noise-proof their homes.

The paper says that homes will be provided with new doors, windows, attic insulation, weather-stripping, and central air and heating systems that should help quiet the noise from airplane overflights; the cost for this work is estimated at $40,000 per home. The state funds will be used specifically for work on about 50 homes that are most affected. 150 homeowners have applied for the acoustic treatment.

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Burbank, California's Airport Reworks Expansion Proposal, Reducing Terminal Size and Gate Count

PUBLICATION: The Daily News of Los Angeles
DATE: May 25, 1999
SECTION: News, Pg. N1
BYLINE: Michael Coit
DATELINE: Burbank, California

The Daily News of Los Angeles reports that Burbank Airport officials adjusted their expansion proposal to better address the concerns of Burbank's City Council. The adjusted document requests 30% less new terminal space, promises steps towards reducing noise in surrounding communities, and proposes that the number of gates be expanded to only 16; the airport would have the option to add three more gates in or after the year 2010. Burbank has long been concerned about airport expansion, and the airport commissioner says the revised proposal "gives the Burbank City Council long-term control over expansion of the terminal."

The article continues by explaining that the city's position has been to limit expansion to 16 gates, and impose a curfew on flights between 10 PM and 7 AM. While the FAA ruled that such a curfew could not be mandatory before a formal study is performed, an appeals court ruled that the city of Burbank does have veto power over airport expansion. Previously, the airport had maintained that Burbank gave up zoning control in 1977 when it, together with Glendale and Pasadena, created a joint governing board. After these rulings, the airport commission decided that construction has been delayed long enough, and created this new compromise will facilitate approval.

The story went on to detail some other elements of the proposal. Included in the document was commitment by the airport to ask the FAA for a ban on takeoffs heading East over Burbank, a significantly stepped-up the residence soundproofing program, a maximum noise impact area of 370 acres surrounding the airport, and an incentives program to encourage adherence to the voluntary night-flight curfew.

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Farmington, Utah's City Council Stance Against Unattractive Noise Walls on I-15 Less Certain After Residents Push for the Structures

PUBLICATION: The Desert News
DATE: May 23, 1999
SECTION: Local; Pg. B09
BYLINE: by Jose Luis Sanchez Jr.
DATELINE: Farmington, Utah
ACTIVISTS, INDIVIDUALS, AND GROUPS MENTIONED: Ed Johnson, concerned citizen

The Desert News reports that Farmington, Utah's city council is now wavering in their stance against noise walls on Interstate 15 that they say would be aesthetically unattractive. 175 residents signed a petition saying the freeway noise is 'overwhelming' and that they want noise walls -- attractive or not -- swaying two council members to their side, while the rest of the council voted to postpone a decision until after further study and public input. The council had been opposed to the walls, which would require amendment of the city's master plan, at a public hearing two weeks ago.

The article continues, noting that the nearby town of Centerville responded to similar resident concerns with a 16-foot 4-inch-tall noise wall of their own. I-15 is soon to be expanded, which would likely increase the noise and make the proposed 2,247 foot wall even more necessary. Utah's DOT will preserve funding for the wall for six months, allowing Farmington to reach a decision. The council members main concern is the aesthetics of the city, and they hope to find a way they might reduce noise without erecting the unattractive walls.

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Poor Weather Forces Rescheduling of Noise Tests to Help Boaters Comply with New Noise Law on Chicago area's Chain o' Lakes

PUBLICATION: Chicago Tribune
DATE: May 24, 1999
SECTION: Metro Lake; Pg. 1; Zone: L
BYLINE: by John Flink
DATELINE: Chicago, Illinois

The Chicago Tribune reports that noise tests, designed to help boaters comply with a new noise ordinance on the Chicago area's Chain o' Lakes, were poorly attended due to miserable weather. The tests will be rescheduled for early June. The new ordinance starts with the state-mandated 90 dB limit for idling boats and 70 dB for moving boats, but gives marine officers the ability to determine excessive noise by ear since traditional noise-measuring equipment is designed for use on the open water.

The article went on to say that officers expect a busy day when the tests are offered again, since these tests can tell boaters whether or not they must invest in an expensive muffler system. Violators will be fined $35, $200, and $500 respectively for their first, second and third violation; boating privileges will also be lost for the season on the third offense. The ordinance was developed in response to resident complaints, and because the buildings along the Fox Waterway reflect and amplify noise. The ordinance originally outlawed cut-off switches, which switch motors from underwater to out of water exhaust, but after boaters complained the ordinance was amended to allow properly mufflered cut-off switches.

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Chicago's O'Hare Airport Slacking on Use of Preferred Night Runways that Disturb Fewer Residents, but Introduction of Quieter Planes Helps to Lessen Noise Complaints

PUBLICATION: Chicago Sun-Times
DATE: May 26, 1999
SECTION: Nws; Pg. 12
BYLINE: by Robert C. Herguth
DATELINE: Chicago, Illinois

The Chicago Sun-Times reports that O-Hare Airport's "Fly Quiet" guidelines, created in 1997 to limit noise between 10 PM and 7 AM, are not always being adhered to. Use of two designated night runways, selected because their flight paths avoid most residential areas, has declined. Despite this fact, nighttime noise complaints have declined from 2,234 to 1,246, due in part to the phasing out of noisier "Phase II" aircraft.

The story also notes that the 28 noise monitors placed across the city and suburbs are also hearing less airplane noise. While complaints are down, Chicago Aviation Department spokesman Dennis Culloton is quick to point out that certain issues, such as continued use of preferred runways, still require attention. One experimental program will be used starting this year that should help planes to stay more closely on their exact flight path.

The article continues, mentioning the "federal slot rule" that limits daytime flights and causes most new flights to be added at night. During 1998 the number of night departures remained at 133, while night arrivals climbed from 121 to 129.

The article reports that one preferential runway has been designated for arrivals, and one for departures. In early 1999, however, use of the preferred departure runway dropped from 20 to 18 percent, meaning that it was no longer the most-used nighttime departure strip. Use of the preferred arrival runway dropped from 31 to 26 percent, though it remained the most-used for arrivals. Schaumburg Village President Al Larson noted that in future studies, researchers should identify which airlines are ignoring the "Fly Quiet" program.

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Louisville, Kentucky Volunteer Committee on Aircraft Noise to Present Findings

PUBLICATION: The Courier-Journal
DATE: May 25, 1999
SECTION: News Pg.02b
DATELINE: Louisville, Kentucky

The Courier-Journal reports that volunteer committees studying aircraft noise, sponsored by the Regional Airport Authority, will present their findings. The committee intends to help Leigh Fisher Associates decide how to measure and deal with airport noise.

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Suburban Communities Surrounding Chicago's O'Hare Airport Say Soundproofing Should Include More Homes, Citing Noise Monitor Data Collected Independently

PUBLICATION: Chicago Daily Herald
DATE: May 25, 1999
SECTION: News; Pg. 8
BYLINE: Leslie Cummings
DATELINE: Chicago, Illinois
ACTIVISTS, INDIVIDUALS, AND GROUPS MENTIONED: Gigi Gruber, mayor of Itasca Illinois

The Chicago Daily Herald reports that the anti-noise Suburban O'Hare Commission (SOC) has been monitoring noise from the airport independently of the city. SOC claims that the data shows high levels of noise up to 80 decibels in communities not covered in this year's soundproofing eligibility list. Gigi Gruber, mayor of one nearby community, says "they average out the silent times with the noisy times and come up with a number. But when airplanes fly over, noise is still at a high level.

The article continues, saying that Chicago follows FAA guidelines in determining where most noise exists. While some houses may get a few seconds of high noise from airplanes, the city's soundproofing program is meant to cover more consistently high noise.

The paper reports that SOC plans to use the data, along with a map they will soon create from it, to approach legislators for more soundproofing money.

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Roselle (Chicago Suburb), Illinois' Schaumburg Airport to Monitor Noise Ordinance Compliance in Response to Resident Complaints

PUBLICATION: Chicago Daily Herald
DATE: May 27, 1999
SECTION: News; Pg. 4
BYLINE: Veronica Gonzales
DATELINE: Roselle, Illinois
ACTIVISTS, INDIVIDUALS, AND GROUPS MENTIONED: Pat Priestley, concerned resident

The Chicago Daily Herald reports that Schaumburg Regional Airport, on the outskirts of Chicago, plans to implement a noise abatement monitoring program in response to continued resident complaints. The program would track flights on random days and record whether pilots are legally high enough when they turn to fly over residential areas.

The paper reported on a recent Airport Advisory Commission meeting where Roselle resident Pat Priestley voiced her angst over constant overflight noise. Priestley stated "(Airplanes) fly directly over my home every two minutes. You can not carry on a normal life on the ground." In response to resident's continued concerns, commissioners plan to implement a noise abatement monitoring program in about a month. The existing noise abatement ordinance already mandates that pilots must climb to 600 feet before turning, and that they must turn left to avoid residential areas. If an airline fails to comply with this ordinance, it could be fined or even expelled from the airport.

The Herald spoke with Mark R. Clements, Airport Administrator, who said the survey would take place on random days; the airport is fairly busy on Mondays and Saturdays, and Friday is the busiest day. Departures would be logged about three hours a week during the busy mornings and evenings. Data would then be compiled, and the results would be used to determine the effectiveness of the noise abatement ordinance and to identify those who are not complying.

While Clements told the Herald that that flights are already tracked, he cited the monitoring program as allowing the airport to accumulate concrete data to help it be the good neighbor it wants to be; a pilot agreed, saying "The majority of us will do what we can to make it quieter for the neighbors." Last year the airport handled 80,000 operations (including a small percentage of takeoff and landing practice procedures known as "touch and gos"); on average, Clements received about 10 noise complaints per month, generally from the same three households.

According to the paper, the village is considering the purchase of a noise meter to supplement the monitoring program. Priestley was delighted to hear of the program and of the potential purchase of a noise meter.

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New Noise Ordinance in Chicago's Fox River Allows Noisy Boats to be Identified By Ear

PUBLICATION: Chicago Daily Herald
DATE: May 26, 1999
SECTION: Neighbor; Crime & Justice; Pg. 1
BYLINE: Bill Cole
DATELINE: Chicago, Illinois

The Chicago Daily Herald reports that a new noise ordinance put in place by the Fox Waterway Agency will discard the old 90 dB noise limit for the subjective limit at which "peace is breached" on the Fox River. The ordinance was introduce because decibel meters were unreliable on the Fox River, where sound bounces off buildings, and many window-rattling violators were having their tickets thrown out in court. First, second, and third noise violations carry minimum $35, $200, and $500 fines respectively.

The article goes on to say that performance boaters are now worried that noise citations will be arbitrary. The Fox Waterway Agency notes that this subjective discretion is already given to highway police when it comes to loud mufflers, but marine cops are offering "decibel checks" to give boaters a better idea of where noise begins. One marine officer offered this guideline: "If I'm in my boat at the Route 120 bridge in McHenry, and I hear a boat approaching from the north, where you can see for about a mile and a half, and I don't see the boat - that's a violation."

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Chicago's O'Hare Noise Compatibility Commission Asked City to Identify Airlines Not Adhering to Preferred Flight Paths

PUBLICATION: Chicago Daily Herald
DATE: May 26, 1999
SECTION: News; Pg. 6
BYLINE: Chris Fusco
DATELINE: Chicago, Illinois
ACTIVISTS, INDIVIDUALS, AND GROUPS MENTIONED: Arlene Mulder, Chair of O'Hare Noise Compatibility Commission

The Chicago Daily Herald reports that O'Hare's Noise Compatibility Commission has asked city officials to identify which airlines stray from routes designed to limit airport noise in residential areas. Many flights are ignoring the designated runways, or turning earlier than suggested.

The article states that the city's aviation department had just released a quarterly report that shows 36 percent of flights are still flying directly over the Northwest suburbs. The designated runways take flights over industrial parks, Busse Woods, and the Northwest Tollway, where noise does not impact residential areas as much. The preferred runway for overnight (10 PM - 7 AM) takeoffs was only be used 18 percent of the time.

The article continues by saying that the city reported a large decrease in noise complaints, despite these deviation. This decrease is due in part to 88 percent of the airlines buying newer, quieter jets or soundproofing old ones. Arlington Heights Village President Arlene Mulder, who chairs the noise commission, said "(The airlines) have come to the table with a very cooperative approach. We think putting this information together will help things."

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Citizen Criticizes Noise Ordinance Amendment as Poorly Written at Batavia, New York City Council Hearing

PUBLICATION: The Buffalo News
DATE: May 25, 1999
SECTION: Local, Pg. 2E
BYLINE: Bill Brown
DATELINE: Batavia, New York

The Buffalo News reports that a noise ordinance amendment in Batavia, New York drew mixed reviews from citizens at the City Council public hearing. The amendment, targeting mainly barking dogs and loud music from cars, is intended to strengthen vague language from the original, setting "objective standards... for violations." One speaker said it was a "legal nightmare" suggesting that even ice cream trucks would be cited. One speaker of three said he would support the amendment, or anything to quiet the streets. The amendment will be voted on June 14.

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Residents Upset at Noise from Sky Harbor International Airport's Increased Use of a Flight Path Over Arizona's Ahwatukee Foothills

PUBLICATION: The Arizona Republic
DATE: May 26, 1999
SECTION: Tempe/Ahwatukee Foothills Community; Pg. Ev1
BYLINE: by Betty Beard
DATELINE: Ahwatukee Foothills, Arizona
ACTIVISTS, INDIVIDUALS, AND GROUPS MENTIONED: Nancy LaRosa, concerned citizen; Lynn Norbury, concerned citizen; Sal DiCiccio, Phoenix Councilman

The Arizona Republic reports that since Sky Harbor International Airport in Phoenix increased its use of an older flight path over the Ahwatukee Foothills, residents have been subjected to increased noise. While many residents are upset, airport officials say they have no solution. Some local legislators are concerned, but maintain that this is fundamentally a federal issue.

The paper goes on to say that the FAA shifted to this flight path for 40 to 80 additional aircraft because of increasing winds from the west and an increase in airport traffic. They maintain that when wind directions shift again, some flights will return to previous flight paths, allowing the problem to fix itself. They also admit, however, that "traffic there has been increasing faster [here] than [at] most other airports." A new flight path would require a public hearing, but this increased use of an existing flight path did not require a hearing. According to the airport, their air traffic manager has already met with some community representatives.

The Arizona Republic says that some residents are taking action. One resident is going door to door to encourage people to call their representatives, while another concerned citizen who is also a civil engineer has plans to document the levels of noise, and then approach regulators with that information. Planes are supposed to be flying 7-10,000 feet above the area, but at least one resident believes it's 4-5,000.

The Arizona Republic also says that Phoenix councilman Sal DiCiccio, whose constituents have expressed concern, is meeting with the FAA this week to find a solution. He admits that it is a federal issue, but "just because it's in another jurisdiction doesn't mean I can't get involved.... The public owns the skies and the airport, having a public hearing is not that much to ask." The Ahwatukee Foothills Village Planning Committee also plans to take up the issue at its June 28 meeting.

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Peoria, Arizona Councilwoman's Proposed Noise Wall Fronts Her Own House, Creating Conflict of Interest

PUBLICATION: The Arizona Republic
DATE: May 26, 1999
SECTION: Northeast Phoenix Community; Pg. 9
BYLINE: by Jeffry Nelson
DATELINE: Peoria, Arizona
ACTIVISTS, INDIVIDUALS, AND GROUPS MENTIONED: Rebekah Coty, Peoria Arizona Councilwoman

The Arizona Republic reports on a noise wall proposed in Peoria, Arizona. The wall has been proposed by councilwoman Rebekah Coty who lives in the community; she has said that she will allow her fellow council members to make the decision, to avoid a conflict of interest.

The paper goes on to say that other council members are hesitating to give their approval, since the move could still be perceived as a conflict of interest. "I couldn't vote to put a block fence in front of her house as long as she's on the council, because it could be perceived we're doing it just because she's on the council," another councilman said. Coty has asked the council to assume control of the $27,963 in her district's budget and designate it for the noise wall project. Her budget reflects the entire $25,000 that each district receives annually, plus a surplus from the previous year.

The article continues by explaining that the 1,200 foot long, 11 foot high noise wall would block Coty's house along with two neighbors from a busy four-lane road. Coty acknowledges the potential conflict of interest, but insists that the noise affects the entire 60-person development. She says "you can't even call the kids, you have to go get them." She also says that property value will go down, since people often move to her development -- which has acre lots -- for a more rural lifestyle and would not welcome so much traffic noise. Before a 1990 road-widening project, trees and other plants helped to block the noise from the road, but repeated attempts by Coty to have plants returned to the location have failed.

The Republic notes that an estimate for a noise wall elsewhere in Peoria of only 235 feet was $11,000, suggesting that Coty's wall may cost more than her budget can pay for.

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County Commissioners in Asheville, North Carolina Consult State Wildlife Commission Concerning Noise and Other Disturbance from an Airboat Operation on the French Broad River

PUBLICATION: Asheville Citizen-Times
DATE: May 26, 1999
SECTION: Local; Pg. B1
BYLINE: Katy Hillenmeyer
DATELINE: Asheville, North Carolina
ACTIVISTS, INDIVIDUALS, AND GROUPS MENTIONED: Ed Bulluck, affected homeowner; Sue Konopka, affected resident

The Asheville Citizen-Times reports that Buncombe County Commissioners will ask the North Carolina Wildlife Resources Commission for help in determining the environmental threats that a small airboat operation may have on the French Broad River. In addition to environmental concerns, citizens are worried about effects on other recreation, safety, and hearing.

The Citizen-Times notes that the operator of the 12-passenger airboat began making commercial trips this spring, and there is no county law that would control the business; the local noise ordinance exempts commercial noise. Nevertheless, the business owner has promised to substitute a quiet propellor.

The paper quotes resident Ed Bulluck as saying "the French Broad River [is] a recreational treasure [that must] be preserved for the common good of all citizens and not the economic gain of a few." Another resident, Sue Konopka, said "We go to the river to escape the very thing the airboat brings.... [The operator] can reduce the decibels, the trip frequency and the speed and be a good neighbor."

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Consultants for Warwick, Rhode Island's T.F. Green Airport Recommend Buying Homes as Most Cost-Effective Way to Reduce Noise Exposure to Residents

PUBLICATION: The Associated Press
DATE: May 26, 1999
SECTION: State and Regional
DATELINE: Warwick, Rhode Island
ACTIVISTS, INDIVIDUALS, AND GROUPS MENTIONED: Landrum & Brown, noise consulting firm

The Associated Press reports that consultants for Rhode Island's Airport Corp. have recommended the purchase of at least 135 homes who are exposed to 70 dB or more of noise from T.F. Green Airport over a 24-hour period. The recommendation came after many homes had already been soundproofed, and options such as extending a secondary runway were explored.

The story goes on to explain that an air-traffic increase at T.F. Green had already necessitated the soundproofing of many homes with a cost to federal taxpayers of $25,000 per house. The $20-million buyout was one of several options considered, including a $100-million to $300-million extension to a secondary runway; pilots were unwilling to use the secondary runway at its present length. The entire noise study will be voted on by the Airport Corporation's directors before being sent to the FAA for final approval next month.

The Associated Press also notes that Landrum & Brown, the consulting firm, is pushing for a $50,000 study to determine whether the expensive runway extension project might be additionally justified for operational reasons.

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Airport Report Goes to Missouri City Council

PUBLICATION: THE KANSAS CITY STAR
DATE: May 29, 1999
SECTION: Zone/Lee's Summit; Pg. 1
BYLINE: Summer Harlow
DATELINE: Lee's Summit, Missouri
ACTIVISTS, INDIVIDUALS, AND GROUPS MENTIONED: Hagan-Richardson farm residents

The Kansas City Star reports that the Board of Aeronautical Commissioners unanimously approved a report on the environmental impacts of a proposed expansion of the Lee's Summit Municipal Airport. The report is scheduled to go before the City Council and, if approved, will go on to the Missouri Department of Transportation. Once approved by the department, the project will proceed. If it is rejected, the department will determine that a more in-dept environmental impact is needed.

The article reported that if the council also approves the report, it will be sent to the Missouri Department of Transportation which will either approve the assessment and the project will proceed, require that a more explicit environmental impact review be conducted.

"This really is a very positive report. When looking at the summary, it looks like most of the impacts are less than significant," said board member Jeanne Willerth in the article.

According to the article, Airport Consultants Coffman Associates presented an overview of the environmental assessment, explaining how each conclusion was reached.

The expansion, said the article, would include lengthening the main north-south runway from 4,000 to 5,500 feet; relocating the airport access road; relocating, extending and strengthening the parallel taxiway; extending the crosswind runway to 4,000 feet and relocating Strother Road, all in an effort to attract larger corporate jets.

A Coffman representative stated that a primary consideration in any environmental assessment is the degree of impact jet noise has on a community.

According to the article, Coffman Associates used a computer-generated model and average daily noise measurements, allowed that the expansion would result in noise levels higher than federal guidelines, but only for three houses, a church and part of a future apartment complex.

The article stated that the homes would be purchased by the city, and developers of the church and apartments were informed about the noise problems.

"We concluded there would not be a significant increase in anticipated noise impacts," Coffman Associates David Fitz said in the article.

Fitz gave an analogy of plane noise to rain. "It starts off sprinkling, then the storm peaks, then it sprinkles again," Fitz said. "The same with an over-flight. It starts off quiet, then it gets louder, then it fades off again."

In the article, Fitz summarized the procedure for a noise analysis. Sound from a plane flying overhead is compressed into one second to determine a single noise level. When the noise occurs between 10 p.m. and 7 a.m., 10 decibels are added to the measured noise level.

According to the article, as many as 19 other considerations are studied for their environmental impact. Among them are land use compatibility, social impacts, water quality, biotic communities and flood plains. The article said that most categories were found to have either no impact or less than significant impact. However, Coffman Associates said 3.4 acres of wetland would be impacted and need to be addressed. And while construction would cause temporary impacts, he said steps would be taken to curb these, also.

According to the article, a potential significant impact was the Hagan-Richardson farm south of the airport that originally was targeted by the city to be purchased. But the farm is eligible for listing on National Register of Historic Places, and recommendations were made to remove it from the acquisition list.

"This has been a typical environmental assessment," Coffman Associates representatives report. "We have not had any real significant impact problems to deal with. In some cases we can look at having to re-create 20 to 30 acres of wetlands, and instead we only have to deal with three."

According to the article, some airport expansion critics have argued that the environmental assessment is invalid because it predicts increased air traffic from the proposed closure of Richards-Gebaur Memorial Airport in Kansas City, even though Kansas City officials may keep Richards-Gebaur open.

But Coffman Associates, reports the article, state that regardless of what happens to Richards-Gebaur, the report still is viable because it addresses environmental, not economic impacts.

According to the article, Coffman Associates projects an increase in air traffic on the assumption that Richards-Gebaur and airports in Independence and Grain Valley would close. He forecast that by 2015 the jets based at the airport would increase from 1 to 10 and all other types of aircraft would increase from 168 to 310.

The article stated that board members agreed they were satisfied with what they heard and were ready to move on to the next step - City Council approval - without further delay.

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Group Says Jet Skis Cause Great Harm to Air, Waterways

PUBLICATION: Associated Press
DATE: May 29, 1999
SECTION: Metro/Region
BYLINE: by Peter Howe and Caroline Louise Cole
DATELINE: Hampton, N.H.
ACTIVISTS, INDIVIDUALS, AND GROUPS MENTIONED: Laurie C. Martin, the study author; Massachusetts Environmental Police director, Richard Murray; Paul Hansen, executive director of the Izaak Walton League; James Gomes, head of the Environmental League of Massachusetts

The Boston Globe reports that a Maryland conservation group and personal watercraft industry officials are clashing over pollution concerns caused by jet skis.

At issue for the conservation group is that water recreation sports have not kept pace with anti-pollution technology, and personal watercraft, jet skis in particular, are heavily pollution the nation's waterways.

Watercraft industry officials claim the conservation group has fabricated their statistics on pollution and jet skis. Other concerns about jet skis come from residents addressing issues beyond issues of air and water pollution.

The noise, wake, and wildlife impacts of personal watercraft have led to growing moves to restrict their use or ban them outright. Other public complaints are that the noise is a nuisance in itself.

The Globe reports that jet skis have given the public an additional reason to resent them because of astounding information released in a recent article released by the Izaak Walton League of America, the conservation group.

In just three hours of operation, says the article, the typical jet ski emits as much smog-causing unburned gasoline as a new car driven 100,000 miles. The conservation group, reports the Globe, the California Air Resources Board as their source.

According to the article, each year in the United States, 1.3 million personal watercraft (Jet Ski is actually a Kawasaki brand name) are in operation. Approximately 6,600 are registered in Massachusetts. Collectively, they leave an amount of petroleum equivalent to 15 times the 10.8 million gallons of the 1989 Exxon Valdez disaster, the article reported, again citing industry data.

According to the Globe, the conservation group is not against all forms of recreation. "The issue is whether regulations concerning personal watercraft have kept up with the pace of technology," said Laurie C. Martin, the study's author. "I don't think a lot of the users have any idea that they are so highly polluting."

The Globe reports, however that an industry leader sharply disputed the group's figures. "There isn't any science to support any of these numbers," said John Donaldson, state affairs director for the Personal Watercraft Industry Association. "What we're dealing with is advocacy organizations that have no responsibility to support facts."

The article went on to say that Donaldson said manufacturers have cut emissions levels by 25 percent on this year's models and are on track to meet a federally mandated 70 percent reduction by 2006.

"I don't think anybody would argue that anything we can do to make the waters of the country cleaner is not a bad goal," Donaldson said.

According to the Globe, since Colonial times, state law has stipuated that everyone has a right to "fish, fowl and navigate" in public waters, including in personal watercraft. Admitting that the loud noise from personal watercraft "drives you crazy after a while," the Massachusetts Environmental Police director, Richard Murray, said. "We can't restrict jet skis outright, but we can regulate them," he added.

The Globe reports that personal watercraft - which can reach 70 m.p.h. have gained popularity over the past 10 years. More than 200,000 are sold each year in the United States, about a third of all new boats.

According to the article, industry officials acknowledge that the typical engine emits unburned 25 to 30 percent of the gasoline it uses. Paul Hansen, executive director of the Izaak Walton League, emphasizes that the pressure should come from tighter regulations, adding that US regulators should demand that manufacturers move to adopt European technology that can cut emissions 80 percent.

Air and water pollution are not the only concerns voiced to local environmental officials, according to the Globe. The noise, wake, and wildlife impacts of personal watercraft have led to increased activity to restrict their use or ban them completely.

The Globe reports that since May 1997, Vermont has banned use of personal watercraft in any body of water smaller than 300 acres, limiting their use to about 30 of the state's 285 lakes and ponds. Maine has a 200-acre limit, and use on Lake Tahoe in California and Nevada will be banned next year.

Massachusetts regulations, according to the article, forbid personal watercraft in lakes and ponds smaller than 75 acres and forbid high-speed operation until they are 150 feet offshore.

According to the article, communities that have recently imposed restrictions beyond state rules on personal watercraft include Edgartown, Halifax, Lenox, Mashpee, Phillipston, Tisbury, and Webster.

The article states that so far,four people have died in Massachusetts personal watercraft accidents, including an off-duty police officer killed earlier this month at Salisbury Beach.

The article reports that James Gomes, head of the Environmental League of Massachusetts, said: "There are many smaller water bodies in Massachusetts that are inappropriate for jet skis. They're too polluting, they're too noisy, and they're too disruptive."

The article concluded with one man, who rode a jet ski for the first time yesterday, saying "It gives you a great sense of freedom. Definitely, I will be back."

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Bid For Noise Barrier Puts Arizona Town Council Against the Wall (May 28, 1999). A city councilwoman in Peoria wants the town council to approve a bid for a block wall between a busy avenue and nearby homes with acre-plus lots. Her proposal is controversial because she would be one of the wall's biggest beneficiaries. The town council voted to table the discussion until after her term expires in June.

PUBLICATION: The Arizona Republic
DATE: May 28, 1999
SECTION: North Phoenix Community; Pg. 3
BYLINE: by Jeffry Nelson
DATELINE: Peoria
ACTIVISTS, INDIVIDUALS, AND GROUPS MENTIONED: Rebekah Coty, Peoria resident;

Peoria, AZ - The Arizona Republic reports that Councilwoman Rebekah Coty wants a block wall built between Olive Avenue and the homes in West Olive Farms, a development in Peoria with acre-plus lots.

The article points out that a problem exists for the city council because she would be one of the wall's biggest beneficiaries.

According to the article, council members, who wanted to avoid the perception of using taxpayer money for the benefit of a council member tabled the matter until June 15, after Coty's term on the council ends next Tuesday.

The article quotes councilman Ken Forgia as saying that he couldn't vote to put a block fence in front of her house as long as Coty is on the council because it could be perceived that the they was doing it just because was a council member.

According to the article, Coty asked her fellow council members to assume control of all $27,963 in the Pine District budget and spend it on a block wall between 93rd and 95th avenues on the southern side of Olive Avenue. The block wall would front her home and those of two neighbors.

According tot he article, Coty says something has to be done to buffer her development from the noise coming from traffic on Olive Avenue. The avenue has two lanes going in each direction, plus a center turning lane.

"This community is being inundated with a tremendous amount of noise, " she said. "The noise is constant.

According to the article, Coty said the noise has hurt her property value and the value of properties throughout the 40-lot West Olive Farms community because people who look to buy acre-size lots want a rural lifestyle with peace and quiet. "We live on acreages for a rural lifestyle, but we have city noise," she said.

The article reports that pine trees and cactus used to stand along Olive Avenue, giving homes some relief from the noise, but the plants were removed during a county road-widening project in 1990 and never replaced.

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JET NOISE RATTLES AHWATUKEE FOOTHILLS; FLIGHT-PATH SHIFT ANGERS RESIDENTS (May 29, 1999). The Arizona Republic reports that the residents of the Ahwatukee Foothill have complained that their once peaceful and serene neighborhoods are destroyed by increased noise from airplanes leaving Sky Harbor International Airport. The article says that although residents are pressuring local and federal officials for help, a Federal Aviation Administration spokesman said the problem may lessen somewhat on its own.

PUBLICATION: Arizona Republic, Saturday Final
DATE: May 29, 1999
SECTION: Northeast Phoenix Community; Pg. 7
BYLINE: by Betty Beard
DATELINE: Phoenix
ACTIVISTS, INDIVIDUALS, AND GROUPS MENTIONED: Nancy LaRosa, resident near Ahwatukee Foothills; Lynn Norbury, resident; Phoenix Councilman Sal DiCiccio.

Phoenix, AZ - The Arizona Republic reports that the residents of the Ahwatukee Foothills have complained that their once peaceful and serene neighborhoods are being destroyed by increased noise from airplanes leaving nearby Sky Harbor International Airport.

The article says that although residents are pressuring local and federal officials for help, a Federal Aviation Administration spokesman said the problem may lessen somewhat on its own.

The article reports that the FAA shifted the flight pattern for 40 to 80 more aircraft to an older route that crosses Ahwatukee Foothills because of increasing winds from the west and the increasing flights at the Phoenix airport.

The article quoted William Shumann, an FAA spokesman in Washington, D.C. in an explanation for the change. "We don't have a solution. As the wind shifts and we use east departures more, we would expect less of an impact on Ahwatukee," Shumann said.

Sky Harbor is the fifth-busiest airport nationwide, and traffic there has increased faster than at most other airports, Shumann was quoted as saying.

According to the article, Nancy LaRosa, who lives in north central Ahwatukee Foothills near Equestrian Estates, first noticed the increased noise in mid-March when dinner guests asked if she were in a flight path.

The article reports that Lynn Norbury, who lives in the same area, reported that she first noticed the noise as she was trying to read a book in her backyard. "I listened to one (airplane) about every 45 seconds from 8 to 10 in the morning," she said.

LaRosa said the noise is the worst she has heard since moving to the area two years ago and is loud even inside her home, forcing her to turn up her television volume, reports the Republic.

The Republic reports that according to Shumann, residents have been noticing the noise more because pleasant weather has drawn them outside. He added that the planes are supposed to be flying 7,000 to 10,000 feet over the area, but LaRosa believes they're a lot lower, maybe 4,000 to 5,000 feet, because of the noise.

According to the Republic, both LaRosa and Norbury independently began taking steps to reduce the noise. Norbury, a civil engineer, plans to document the noise levels so she can prove to regulators how the noise has affected the Ahwatukee Foothills.

The article reports that LaRosa has been walking door to door handing out fliers urging residents to call U.S. Sen. John McCain, R-Ariz., Congressmen Matt Salmon and Ed Pastor, Phoenix Councilman Sal DiCiccio and Sky Harbor's sound abatement officer, Ellis Owens.

Shumann says, reports the Republic, that a number of residents have already called the FAA. And George Sullivan, air traffic manager at Sky Harbor, has met already with some community representatives.

The Republic reports that DiCiccio, who has received many complaints, was to meet this week with the FAA in a search of a solution.

According to the article, Phoenix owns the airport, but the FAA controls flight paths.

"But just because it's in another jurisdiction doesn't mean I can't get involved," said DiCiccio, who lives near 42nd Street and Chandler Boulevard.

The article quotes DiCiccio in his attempts to call for a public hearing. "The public owns the skies and the airport. Having a public hearing is not that much to ask."

According to the FAA officials, reports the Republic, the change in the flight pattern over the airport is not a new flight plan, just an increased use of an old one so the FAA is not required to hold a public hearing or complete an environmental impact study.

The Republic reports that the Ahwatukee Foothills Village Planning Committee also plans to take up the issue at its June 28 meeting.

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Louisiana Racetrack Loses Bid to Block Town From Enforcing Noise Ordinance

PUBLICATION: Associated Press
DATE: May 29, 1999
SECTION: State And Regional
DATELINE: Greenwood, La.
ACTIVISTS, INDIVIDUALS, AND GROUPS MENTIONED: Town Attorney M. Allyn Stroud; Caddo District Judge Frank Thaxton

An Associated Press article reports that on the eve of a special racing event, the Boothill Speedway in Greenwood, Louisiana lost its battle with the town's enforcement of a noise ordinance. Boothill Speedway owners were prepared for a fine because the special event would violate curfew and noise ordinances, but were not prepared for the ruling.

The article goes on to say that the law, enacted by the Town Council in 1973, prohibits car race tracks, dance halls and bowling alleys from operating after 10 p.m. weekdays and after midnight Saturday. It also bars them from opening on Sunday

Boothill owner Linda Paine was reported as saying that while racing at the track has wrapped up early, and despite the ruling, she did not expect that to happen Saturday because of a special racing event.

According to the article, the ruling by Caddo District Judge Frank Thaxton came on the eve of a special event at Boothill which drew 165 cars the last time it was held at the track.

"I feel sure we will go past 12 and we won't close the track," Paine said. "I'll get a fine. But we'll continue to run. We have got a lot of people from out of town coming in this weekend."

The article says that the town cited the speedway for violating the noise law May 9 by starting a car race after midnight. The track, opened the same year the noise ordinance was put in place, never before had been cited because its owners had been responsive in past years to abide by the law, according to town Attorney M. Allyn Stroud.

"Of course, we're pleased with the ruling," Stroud said. "We've said all along that the midnight closing time is a reasonable restriction on noise. "

Thaxton found the law "rationally related to a legitimate government objective" of protecting citizens from excessive noise.

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Louisiana Residents Angered by Airport's Delay To control Noise

PUBLICATION: The Times-Picayune
DATE: May 28, 1999
SECTION: Metro; Pg. B3
BYLINE: Matt Scallan
DATELINE: Kenner, LA
ACTIVISTS, INDIVIDUALS, AND GROUPS MENTIONED: Beverly Kirkland, Kenner resident; Kenner resident Ralph Hihar; Kenner resident Greg Piper; Driftwood subdivision resident Sue Giliberti

The Times-Picayune reports that residents of Kenner, a small town near the New Orleans airport attended a public hearing about airplane noise. The purpose of the hearing was to explain recommendations given by the federal government, but residents were suspicious that the hearing was merely window dressing, and that the results simply justify what airport officials are already doing.

According to the article, the hearing was to explain what the study can recommend, given the restrictions by the federal government, but residents do not trust the study's goals.

Resident Beverly Kirkland asked whether the study was going to justify what the airport officials were already doing, according to the article.

"We want an objective look at what the noise level is," replied Ryk Dunkelberg of Bernard & Dunkelberg Associates of Tulsa, Okla.

"I think it's good that they are going to find out what the noise level is," said resident Ralph Hihar after the 2 1/2-hour meeting at the Pontchartrain Center. "I just hope they don't use it against us."

According to the article, the deadline for the study is within 14 months, and is designed to measure the effect airport noise has on neighborhoods.

The article reported all aircraft will be required to adhere to new federal noise standards, and that airport noise will be significantly reduced after January 1. Kenner Councilman John Lavarine III challenged whether the "hush kits," installed to make older aircraft compliant with the new standards will really work.

The Times-Picayune added that the local government has very few options to reduce airport noise by itself.

The article reports that some residents charge airport officials with moving forward slowly.

"Why are they spending money on this study when they could be using it to soundproof the houses?" resident Greg Piper asked, to wide applause.

The article says that when airport consultants told residents that another airport had built a new runway in flight patterns away from homes, he was challenged by residents as to whether the airport justified building the controversial runway because other neighborhoods would be affected by noise.

According to the article, residents also complained about flights that do not follow the preferred flight path.

"One of them passed so low that my car alarm went off," said Driftwood subdivision resident Sue Giliberti.

The article quoted Dunkelberg as saying planes can follow a tighter pattern during busy periods, the result is a concentration in noise levels.

According to the article, the consultants are asking residents to volunter their homes as noise -monitoring stations to measure whether noise levels for different aircraft at the New Orleans airport conform to and accepted federal noise profile. That information, says the Times Picayune, will be used to construct a computer model of noise levels from data collected by the New Orleans control tower.

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Department of Transportation To Measure for Noise Along I-

PUBLICATION: The Plain Dealer
DATE: May 28, 1999
SECTION: Metro; Pg. 1B
BYLINE: by Karen Farkas
DATELINE: Twinsburg
ACTIVISTS, INDIVIDUALS, AND GROUPS MENTIONED: Ed Deley, engineer for Ohio Department of Transportation; Judith Koncsol, city councilwoman, Twinsburg OH

The Plain Dealer reports that an engineer for the Ohio Department of Transportation will measure the noise level of vehicles traveling on Interstate 480.

According to the article, officials will use the results to decide whetehr to place sound barriers along I-480 between Ohio 82 and the Cuyahoga County line.

The article also states the engineer reported that measurements taken earlier this month from the backyards of a street parallel to the interstate show decibel levels high enough to justify the barriers.

The article reports that three measurements taken during the morning rush hour showed readings above the required 67 decibel level. One reading was at 69.9 decibels. The level of noise at 67 decibels is about equivalent to standing 100 feet from a gas-powered lawn mower.

The article went on to say that other noise measurements, taken on another portion of the same street as well as another street, also recorded levels above 67 decibels.

According to the article, Ed Deley, the engineer, planned to measure the levels one more time and hopes to go to the same locations that were used for noise measurements four years ago. At that time, the level was not high enough for barriers.

The report said residents in the area asked for the new measurements because of in traffic as well as the speed limit.

According to the article, Deley plans to measure a few more areas and then report to the city council this summer. Sound barriers are ususally made of wood or concrete and cost about $1 million per mile to install, the article says. The current policy requires the city to pay half the cost.

One city councilwoman announced she hopes the city council would support and fund barrier construction, the article said.

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English Businessman Wins Damages Over Aircraft Noise

PUBLICATION: Press Association Newsfile
DATE: May 27, 1999
SECTION: Home News
BYLINE: Jan Colley
DATELINE: East Sussex England
ACTIVISTS, INDIVIDUALS, AND GROUPS MENTIONED: Graham Farley, Uckfield, Sussex, England

The Press Association of England reports a High Court awareded a wealthy resident 10,750 because of the effect of aircraft noise on the value of his home. The PA article the judge as stating that it was not as if the residence - 15 miles from Gatwick Airport- was "on the end of a B52 runway", but it was a question of degree of noise. The article stated that the resident, Graham Farley, was not an overly sensitive man and had done his best to tolerate the situation. Farley attempted to avoid problems initially by giving instructions to Michael Skinner, a surveryor whom he had paid, to check the effect of the house's proximity to Gatwick, and now his view now was that he shouldn't have to tolerate the noise.

The judge accepted Farley's evidence, the article said. According to the PA article, Skinner, denying negligence, agreed the subject was raised but said that he did not receive specific instructions. Skinner added that he talked to neighbors and listened for noise while on visits to the house but did investigate Gatwick. He did, though, agree that the noise could have an adverse effect on the value of the house. The article said that the judge stated the disagreement was an honest difference between two honorable witnesses. The judge rejected Mr Farley's claim for damages for alleged diminution of his house's value but did award him 10,000 plus interest for distress and inconvenience caused.

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California City To Sue Orange County Over Flights

PUBLICATION: The Orange County Register
DATE: May 27, 1999
SECTION: Community; Pg. 01
BYLINE: Laura Corbin
DATELINE: Irvine
ACTIVISTS, INDIVIDUALS, AND GROUPS MENTIONED: Ivine City Council

The Orange County Register reports that the Irvine City Council took an aggressive legal position instead of merely accepting flight demonstrations scheduled at the Marine Corps Air Station at El Toro.

According to article, the council will sue the county because the county was improperly exempted from a mandatory environmental report prior to the flight demonstrations.

The article cited one councilman's concerns over safety. "My own view is that this (the county's plan) is not only wasteful, it is extremely dangerous," said Councilman Larry Agran, referring to the airport's close proximity to foothills.

The article reported that this is the first suit undertaken by the city's Legal Affairs Committee, which was established in January to fight the county's plans for an airport at El Toro. According to Agran, court costs are expected to be between $10,000 and $25,000, a sum he believes is a worthy investment.

He stated that a successful suit against the flight demonstrations would save Orange County taxpayers nearly $1.3 million.

Greg Smith, another Councilman, reported that the council will hire an independent contractor to test noise levels generated by the test flights, in order to have substantiation they can trust to form their own conclusions.

The article also reported that during an Orange County Board of Supervisors meeting earlier this month, Agran asked supervisors to cancel the flights because of safety concerns. He cited the 1965 crash of a military transport into the Lomas Ridge, killing 84 Marine passengers and flight crew.

The article reported that he read from a prepared statement, claiming that the tragedy was the result of a "tragic miscalculation" that the northerly flight path was safe.

Councilman and pilot Dave Christensen described a close call he had at the Lomas Ridge after an airshow at the Marine base, the article said.

A larger passenger or cargo plane would have more power but would be heavier and more difficult to maneuver in a similar situation, according to the article.

Though other South County cities that are members of the El Toro Reuse Planning Authority consider the flight demonstrations wasteful, Irvine is the only city to stop them, the article said.

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Commonwealth Court Examines Hazardous Noise for Workers' Compensation

PUBLICATION: The Legal Intelligencer
DATE: May 27, 1999
SECTION: Bs; Pg. 7
BYLINE: by John P. Meyers

The Legal Intelligencer reports two cases in which the Commonwealth Court has looked at the circumstances where a Workers' Compensation Judge may review and consider the facts of a case.

In the first case, the result was unexpected, according to the Legal Intelligencer. According to the article, an individual's claim was presented for occupational hearing loss. The worker had been employed at General Electric for 32 years, and filed a claim in 1995, stating that he suffers binaural hearing loss because of exposure to noise at work from machines such as lathes, radial drills, tape machines, robotics and drills. However, the article reports, at the time of the claim, the worker had transferred to a quieter job and had worn ear protection for eight or nine years. The article reports that the individual claimed that his exposure to noise began with his employment at age 20. An expert for the worker testified that the individual had sustained a prolonged exposure to occupational noise, and resulted in over 10 percent hearing loss under the AMA guidelines.

According to the article, after all evidence was submitted, the claimant was awarded hearing loss benefits at level he stated in the initial claim--over 10 percent. The article further reports that the Appeal Board affirmed and the employer appealed to the Commonwealth Court arguing that the worker had not been exposed to occupational noise. According to the Legal Intelligencer, under the OSHA's Occupational Noise Exposure Standards, the worker had been exposed to fewer than 90 decibels of occupational noise over an eight-hour day. The employer argued, therefore, that the claimant's hearing loss was not compensatory. The article goes on to say that the Commonwealth Court examined this challenge but determined that the OSHA Standards refer to audiometric testing, which "does not require nor state that the level of exposure must be found to be above a certain level to be characterized as 'hazardous' before a compensatory hearing loss can be established." The article says that regulations provide that the 90-decibel threshold requires an employer to implement a hearing conservation program, and include monitoring and testing programs. Regulations do not, according to the article's findings serve as a threshold for worker's compensation. According to the article, the decision to hearing loss benefits was affirmed once the court had disposed the employer's other grounds for appeal. According to the Legal Intelligencer, since the Commonwealth Court has, in the past, used regulatory acts in other areas to compensation, the Court's ruling does not seem consistent with this decision. The article acknowledges that while OSHA standards do not state that noise below 90 decibels is not hazardous, it would seem to be a fairly strong inference considering that OSHA requirements are not implicated below 90 dB. The article infers that if OSHA isn't worried, then these noise levels would not be a matter of serious concern.

For copies of opinion in General Electric Co. and Electric Ins. Co. v. WCAB (Rizzo), PICS NO. 99-0910, consult The Legal Intelligencer. Please refer to the Pennsylvania Instant Case Service order form on Page 9.

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California State Senate Oks Funds For Flight Path

PUBLICATION: The Los Angeles Times
DATE: May 27, 1999
SECTION: Metro; Part B; Page 3; Zones Desk
BYLINE: Andrew Blankstein
DATELINE: Sacramento
ACTIVISTS, INDIVIDUALS, AND GROUPS MENTIONED: Sen. Adam Schiff (D-Burbank)

The Los Angeles times reports that the state Senate voted to add $400,000 to the state budget for insulating 50 homes that lie under the flight path of Burbank Airport.

According to the article, the federal government will match the state funding with a $1.6 million grant from the Federal Aviation Administration to pay for a noise reduction program.

The article quoted Sen. Adam Schiff (D-Burbank) as saying that "The state has a clear and compelling interest in ensuring that homes in the most heavily noise-impacted areas are insulated against burdensome aircraft noise."

The article reports that the Burbank-Glendale-Pasadena Airport Authority has spent $22 million to insulate homes and schools in the airport's flight path from jet noise.

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How Loud Can Sound Be? (May 27, 1999) According to The Hartford Courant, sound, which is measured in decibels (dB), ranges from normal conversation at 50 to 60 dB to the loudest sound tolerated by the human ear at about 120dB. The Hartford Courant gives several examples of different sounds that we hear in the course of a normal day. A soft whisper measures 30 dB. Trains can produce a sound measuring as high as 93 dB about 100 feet in advance. An alarm clock at two feet measures 80 dB. Immediate danger to the human ear is 120 dB, sound levels from a thunderclap or in front of speakers at rock concerts.

PUBLICATION: THE HARTFORD COURANT
DATE: May 27, 1999
SECTION: Main; Pg. A15
BYLINE: The Hartford Courant
DATELINE: Connecticut
ACTIVISTS, INDIVIDUALS, AND GROUPS MENTIONED: Deafness Research Foundation

THE Hartford Courant reports on sound volume, which is measured in decibels, (dB). The article gives several expampls of different sounds that we can hear in the course of a normal day. Normal conversation measures about 50 to 60 dB. According to the Courant, the loudest sound that can be tolerated by the human ear is about 120 dB. Federal Railroad Administration officials, reports the Courant, say a train traveling 45 miles per hour or greater would produce a sound measuring a maximum of 93 dB. The article goes on to say that FRA regulations require train warning horns to be set no less than 96dB, to be heard 100 feet in advance. The article lists several other sounds that we hear: 30 dB -- a quiet Library or soft whisper; 70 dB -- busy traffic, noisy restaurant. At this level, reports the Courant, noise may begin to affect your hearing if exposure is constant. Subways, heavy city traffic, alarm clock at two feet, and factory noise all measure 80 dB. These noises are dangerous if you are exposed to them for more than eight hours. A Chain saw, stereo headphones, pneumatic drill measure 100 dB. According to the article, even two hours of exposure can be dangerous at 100 dB and with each 5 dB increase, the "safe time" is cut in half. Sound at a Rock concert in front of speakers, sandblasting, thunderclap measure 120 dB, and the danger is immediate, reports the Courant. At 120 dB, the article reports, exposure can injure your ear. A gunshot blast and a jet plane measure 140 dB, and the article reports that any length of exposure time is dangerous and may cause actual pain in the ear. At 180 dB, the sound at a rocket launching pad, noise at this level causes irreversible damage without ear protection and hearing loss is inevitable. The Hartford Courant data on decibel level was compiled by the Deafness Research Foundation for BlueCross and BlueShield of Massachusetts

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California Town's Support of Curfew Critical in Ending Airport Battle

PUBLICATION: Daily News of Los Angeles
DATE: May 27, 1999
SECTION: News, Pg. N3
BYLINE: Lee Condon
DATELINE: Glendale
ACTIVISTS, INDIVIDUALS, AND GROUPS MENTIONED: Glendale Councilman Dave Weaver; Burbank City Manager Robert "Bud" Ovrom

According to the Daily News of Los Angeles, a turnover in airport commissioners from the Glendale City Council has resulted in an imminent end to a four year battle with the city of Burbank over a noise curfew and the expansion of the airport terminal.

Glendale's commissioners were advised to take Burbank's complaints about airplane noise to heart or risk losing their seat on the panel, according to the article.

Glendale Councilman Dave Weaver invited commissioners to resign if they "didn't get the message," the article reports.

According to the article, the airport is in Burbank, the nine airport commissioners are appointed by city councils from Burbank, Glendale and Pasadena. Glendale city council members have refrained from participating in the controversy, leaving decisions up to the airport commissioners.

The Daily News reports that for the last four years, the city of Burbank battled with the Glendale-Pasadena majority on the issue, and has filed million-dollar lawsuits to stop the airports expansion. Mediation effort have failed. In exchange for not opposing an expanded terminal, Burbank wants a curfew from 10 p.m. to 7 a.m. as well as noise budget, the article says.

According to the Daily News, Glendale airport Commissioner Carl Raggio said all the airport commissioners are serious about applying to the Federal Aviation Administration for a curfew.

"We don't intend to spend the money for nothing" he told the Daily Herald.

What has yet to be decided is whether the curfew will apply only to commercial aircraft or include private and business jets, which comprise 80 percent of the flights during curfew hours.

A recent court decision gave Burbank veto power over the expansion, and later, the FAA declined Burbank's request for a mandatory in lieu of completing a time-consuming noise study, the article reports.

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California Senate Approves Budget Increase For Airport Noise Remedies

PUBLICATION: The Daily News of Los Angeles, Glendale-Burbank Edition
DATE: May 27, 1999
SECTION: News, Pg. N3
DATELINE: California
ACTIVISTS, INDIVIDUALS, AND GROUPS MENTIONED: Sen. Adam Schiff, D-Pasadena

The Daily News of Los Angeles reports that the California Senate approved a $400,000 budget increase to insulate homes in the flight path of Burbank Airport against noise.

According to the article, Sen. Adam Schiff, D-Pasadena, said the federal government will spend an additional $1.6 million to help lessen the noise from jets traveling over the houses in the flight path. Improvements include new doors, windows, attic insulation, weather-stripping, and central air and heating systems.

The $400,000 in state funds, reports the Daily News, will pay for work on approximatel50 homes under the airport's noisiest flight paths.

The Daily News reports that about 150 homeowners in Burbank and Los Angeles have applied for the improvements, costing about $40,000 per home.

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Illinois Town Targets Loud Parties With Second Noise Ordinance

PUBLICATION: Chicago Tribune
DATE: May 28, 1999
SECTION: Mchenry County; Pg. 2; Zone: Mc; Mchenry Overnight.
BYLINE: John Flink
DATELINE: Chain O' Lakes
ACTIVISTS, INDIVIDUALS, AND GROUPS MENTIONED: Michael Mueller, Fox Waterway Agency's board of directors;

The Chicago Tribune reports that the Fox Waterway Agency's board of directors passed a second noise ordinance this year because of complaints about excessive noise on the waterway, not from boat engines but from loud parties.

According to the article, this ordinance addresses noise in general on the waterway, coming after an earlier one that limited from power boat engines. The article reports that the power boat owners contested the first ordinance because marine patrol officers decide what is loud, and such authority could be misused.

The Tribune reports that the latest ordinance goes even further. The earlier ordinance used decibels as measurement, but the new ordinance is vague, reading only that "No person on the waterway shall cause or create excessive or unusual noise which results in a breach of the peace."

The article reports that legislators and law enforcement officials reported many more complaints about loud parties than engine noise, according to Michael Mueller, the agency director's.

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Illinois Airport Plans To Monitor Airplane Noise (May27, 1999).

PUBLICATION: C5
DATE: May 27, 1999
SECTION: News; Pg. 4
BYLINE: Veronica Gonzales
DATELINE: Roselle, Ill.
ACTIVISTS, INDIVIDUALS, AND GROUPS MENTIONED: Airport Administrator Mark R. Clements; Tom Dailly interim Commissioner; Pat Priestley

The Chicago Daily Herald reports that esidents near Schaumburg Airport have registered so many complaints about airplane noise that airport officials are now monitoring noise levels. Officials added, according to the report, that pilots have emphasized their intent to be as considerate as possible of residents in the area.

The article reports one resident complained tearfully that the current frequency of training landings and take offs prevent her from living a normal life. "(Airplanes) fly directly over my home every two minutes. You can not carry on a normal life on the ground." The article explains that the monitoring program will log departures about three hours a week during the busiest flight times, which occur during mornings and evenings, on random days; Mondays and Saturdays (fairly busy) and Fridays (the busiest day).

In order to track flights, the article says, staff members would stand in an area of the field where they can see aircraft.

In addition the monitoring program requires that that pilots turn left to avoid residential areas.

The Daily Herald reports Airport Administrator Mark R. Clements as saying that data from the monitoring program would then be compiled in a report to determine the effectiveness of the noise ordinance.

Residents are pleased with the policy, according to the article.

The Daily Herald reports that while the new monitoring program may be able to gauge the effectiveness of the noise abatement ordinance, Clements tracks flights on his own.

The monitoring program, explains the article, takes what Clements does one step further because it would accumulate concrete data.

"It's a quality improvement tool," Clements said. "This airport wants to be a good neighbor."

The article reports that last year the airport handled 80,000 operations, including departures and landings.

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City Council Approves Noise Abatement Policy (May 27, 1999). According to the Bangor Daily News, Bangor city councilors on the airport committee approved a noise abatement policy for Bangor International Airport.

PUBLICATION: Bangor Daily News
DATE: May 27, 1999
BYLINE: Roxanne Moore Saucier
ACTIVISTS, INDIVIDUALS, AND GROUPS MENTIONED: BIA Director Bob Ziegelaar; BIA airport Marketing Director Jeff Russell

BANGOR - According to the Bangor Daily News, city councilors on the airport committee approved a noise abatement policy for Bangor International Airport (BIA).

The article stated that BIA Director Bob Ziegelaar stated that the policy formalizes what the airport has been following the past couple of years to cover flight training and engine testing.

The article reports that the policy includes:

Engine "run-ups," the testing airplane maintenance, will generally be prohibited between 10 p.m. and 6 a.m. Approaches and landings for flight training, including "touch-and-gos," will generally be prohibited between 9:30 p.m. and 5:30 a.m. According to the article, willful violations will be punishable by a fine of up to $1,000 per occurrence.

The article reports that these and other restrictions will not be absolute, but an operator will need to contact BIA for a waiver if a problem necessitates engine testing during nighttime hours, for example.

According to the article, Ziegelaar said that the Federal Aviation Administration does not tell commercial airlines or military bases that they can't perform various activities at certain hours, so the airport has to handle that itself.

The article explains that the airport's goal is to be accommodating to those who use the airport, while being as considerate as possible of quality-of-life issues for those in BIA's flight path.

Ziegelaar reported that the situation has much improved from about 10 years ago, when planes operated regularly by Bar Harbor Airlines were extremely loud.

The Daily News reports that BIA has attempted to operate with the guidelines since August 1997, and has sent letters to various military bases that sometimes send large C-5s and other noisier aircraft to Bangor.

According to the article, in other business, the director reported that Comair's three flights a day continue to be successful, and a fourth daily flight will begin June 1.

The need is there for the extra flight, he said, "and no doubt this one will do very well. " The Daily News reports that Ziegelaar and Marketing Director Jeff Russell met recently with Atlantic Coast Airlines to talk about a proposal for using 50-passenger jets to connect Bangor with Dulles Airport in Washington.

"And we're continuing discussions with USAir," he said, regarding BIA's "standing request" for a Bangor-to-Philadelphia route according to the Daily News.

The article continued, quoting Ziegelaar as stating that the airline industry is extremely competitive, and Congress sometimes is not helpful.

He went on to explain that small airports in Bar Harbor and Augusta, for example, receive federal subsidies designed to protect "essential services" that keep a remote area from being isolated.

Ziegelaar said he questioned whether that subsidy was appropriate when there was access to one or more other airports within a two-hour drive, according to the Daily News.

According to the article, Russell gave the example that Continental Airlines "cherry-picks" passengers out of Boston and flies them to Bar Harbor, where the airline can make a bigger profit thanks to the subsidy.

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Clinton Administration's Noise Controls For Mines Criticized

PUBLICATION: Associated Press
DATE: May 27, 1999
SECTION: State and Regional
BYLINE: by Anick Jesdanun
DATELINE: Washington, D.C.
ACTIVISTS, INDIVIDUALS, AND GROUPS MENTIONED: Joseph A. Main, a health and safety administrator with the United Mine Workers of America; Davitt McAteer, assistant labor secretary for mine safety and health

The Associated Press reports that a Republican senator from Wyoming is questioning the Clinton administration's proposal to require that mine operators protect workers from noise.

According to the AP article, the proposal would require mine operators to use every engineering and administrative options from buying quieter machines to rotating employees before using earplugs to meet noise -reduction requirements.

Sen. Michael B. Enzi, (R-Wyo.), chair of the Senate subcommittee on employment, safety and training, says he does not understand the proposed regulaitons. "I seriously question whether those who wrote this rule have ever actually been to a mine," he said.

The article goes on to explain that the proposal was issued in 1996 to help protect miners from work-related hearing loss.

Bruce Watzman, vice president of safety and health for the National Mining Association, explained in the article that the problem is with the process for writing new rules. He stated that once new rules have been written, it's often too late to offer alternatives that could be less expensive and burdensome on mine owners.

The AP article reports that critics of the proposal claim it is too expensive and challenging for small mine operators with limited funds. Critics further claim that other industries do not face the same rigid rules for noise protection.

Enzi instead, has crafted a bill that would require the mine agency to meet with representatives of small mines to discuss the possible effect new rules would have on their operations, the article says.

According to the article, J. Davitt McAteer, assistant labor secretary for mine safety and health, sees no need for Enzi's proposed legislation. He added the agency seeks input from mine operators, especially smaller ones.

According to the AP article, McAteer says the Clinton proposal would help prevent about 30,000 cases of hearing loss without changing current standards. Without any changes, the article quotes McAteer as saying that about 46,000 miners will suffer serious hearing loss during their lifetime.

The article quotes Joseph A. Main, a health and safety administrator with the United Mine Workers of America, as saying earplugs do little to protect hearing. "It's a joke," he told senators, adding that requirements for additional panels would only delay the benefits to mine workers.

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Vote On Noise Ordinance Delayed at Pennsylvania Township Meeting; More than 50 Protest Proposal

PUBLICATION: Allentown Morning Call
DATE: May 27, 1999
SECTION: Local/Region, Pg. B4
BYLINE: Zackie Due
DATELINE: Upper Saucon Township
ACTIVISTS, INDIVIDUALS, AND GROUPS MENTIONED: Limeport Pike resident Peter Kuhlmann

The Morning Call reports that over 50 residents attended an Upper Saucon Township Board of Supervisors meeting to stop a proposed noise ordinance that defines and enforces noise levels and restricts the location of shooting ranges.

According to the article all but three of the residents opposed the proposed ordinance because it was too narrow, and would prevent the firing of a gun practically anywhere in town.

The article said supervisors introduced the proposal saying that shooting firearms involved raised concerns about safety and noise pollution.

One amendment to the proposal, according to the article, excludes shooting during hunting season or "sighting in" a firearm on the hunter's own property

Some residents are angry about the proposal and voiced their disagreement to the board. "I'm tired of new people moving in here and expecting us to change our lives," said Apple Butter Hill Road resident Rick Nelson. "I've lived here some 30 years. I've shot in my back yard all my life and I will continue to do it whether this ordinance is passed or not."

In an effort to avoid confusion at the next hearing, the article reports that Township Manager Bernard Rodgers, after studying the pending legislation, said the supervisors may consider separating the noise ordinance from the shooting restrictions.

The Morning Call reports that only three residents supported adoption of the proposed ordinance.

The article says that the ordinance sets decibel levels for residential, agricultural and industrial zones, not noise from domestic power tools, chain saws, lawn mowers, and other power tools between 8 a.m. and 9 p.m. The Morning Call also listed other excluded noises: construction, including blasting; street and utility repair operations; agricultural uses, including all motorized farm vehicles; motor vehicles traveling on public roads; public celebrations authorized by the township; railroads and aircraft.

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Jet Noise Distrubs Arizona Foothills and Angers Residents

PUBLICATION: Arizona Republic, Saturday Final
DATE: May 29, 1999
SECTION: Northeast Phoenix Community; Pg. 7
BYLINE: by Betty Beard
DATELINE: Phoenix
ACTIVISTS, INDIVIDUALS, AND GROUPS MENTIONED: Nancy LaRosa, resident near Ahwatukee Foothills; Lynn Norbury, resident; Phoenix Councilman Sal DiCiccio.

The Arizona Republic reports that the residents of the Ahwatukee Foothills have complained that their once tranquil neighborhoods are being destroyed by increased noise from airplanes leaving nearby Sky Harbor International Airport.

The article says that although residents are pressuring local and federal officials for help, a Federal Aviation Administration spokesman said the problem may take care of itself.

The article reports that the FAA changed the flight path for 40 to 80 more aircraft to an older route that crosses Ahwatukee Foothills because of western winds and an increase in flight traffic at the Phoenix airport.

The article quoted William Shumann, an FAA spokesman in Washington, D.C. in an explanation for the change. "We don't have a solution. As the wind shifts and we use east departures more, we would expect less of an impact on Ahwatukee," Shumann said.

Sky Harbor is the fifth-busiest airport nationwide, and traffic there has increased faster rate than most other airports, Shumann was quoted as saying.

According to the article, Nancy LaRosa, who lives in north central Ahwatukee Foothills near Equestrian Estates, first noticed the increased noise in mid-March when dinner guests asked if she were in a flight path.

The article reports that Lynn Norbury, who lives in the same area, reported that she first noticed the noise as she was trying to read a book in her backyard. "I listened to one (airplane) about every 45 seconds from 8 to 10 in the morning."

LaRosa said the noise is the worst she has heard since moving to the area two years ago and is loud even inside her house, forcing her to turn up her television, reports the Republic.

The Republic reports that according to Shumann, residents have been noticing the noise more because they are outside in pleasant weather. He added that the planes should be flying 7,000 to 10,000 feet over the area, but LaRosa believes they're a lot lower, maybe 4,000 to 5,000 feet, because of the noise.

According to the Republic, both LaRosa and Norbury are taking independent steps to reduce the noise. Norbury, a civil engineer, will document the noise levels so she can prove to regulators the impact on the Ahwatukee Foothills.

The article reports that LaRosa has been walking door to door handing out fliers urging residents to call U.S. Sen. John McCain, R-Ariz., Congressmen Matt Salmon and Ed Pastor, Phoenix Councilman Sal DiCiccio and Sky Harbor's sound abatement officer, Ellis Owens.

Shumann says that a number of residents have already called the FAA. And George Sullivan, air traffic manager at Sky Harbor, has met already with some community representatives.

The Republic reports that DiCiccio, who has received many complaints, plans to meet with the FAA in a search of a solution.

"But just because it's in another jurisdiction doesn't mean I can't get involved," said DiCiccio, who lives near 42nd Street and Chandler Boulevard.

The article quotes DiCiccio in his attempts to call for a public hearing. "The public owns the skies and the airport. Having a public hearing is not that much to ask."

According to the FAA officials, reports the Republic, the change in the flight pattern over the airport is not a new flight plan, just an increased use of an old one so the FAA is not required to hold a public hearing or complete an environmental impact study.

The Republic reports that the Ahwatukee Foothills Village Planning Committee also plans to take up the issue at a future meeting.

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Louisiana Racetrack Loses; Noise Ordinance Wins (May 29, 1999).


DATE: May 29, 1999
SECTION: State And Regional
DATELINE: Greenwood, La.
ACTIVISTS, INDIVIDUALS, AND GROUPS MENTIONED: Town Attorney M. Allyn Stroud; Caddo District Judge Frank Thaxton

An Associated Press article reports that on the eve of a special racing event, the Boothill Speedway in Greenwood, Louisiana lost its battle with the town's enforcement of a noise ordinance.

The article goes on to say that the law, enacted by the Town Council in 1973, prohibits car race tracks, dance halls and bowling alleys from operating after 10 p.m. weekdays and after midnight Saturday. It also bars them from opening on Sunday

Boothill owner Linda Paine was prepared for a fine because the special event would violate curfew and noise ordinances, but not for the ruling. She was reported as saying that while racing at the track has wrapped up early, and despite the ruling, she did not expect that to happen Saturday because of the special racing event.

According to the article, the ruling by Caddo District Judge Frank Thaxton came on the eve of a special event at Boothill, which drew 165 cars the last time it was held at the track.

"I feel sure we will go past 12 and we won't close the track," Paine said. "I'll get a fine. But we'll continue to run. We have got a lot of people from out of town coming in this weekend."

The article says that the town cited the speedway for violating the noise law May 9 by starting a car race after midnight. The track, which opened the same year the noise ordinance was put in place, had never before been cited because its owners had been responsive in past years to abide by the law, according to town Attorney M. Allyn Stroud.

"Of course, we're pleased with the ruling," Stroud said. "We've said all along that the midnight closing time is a reasonable restriction on noise. "

Thaxton found the law "rationally related to a legitimate government objective" of protecting citizens from excessive noise.

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Bid For Noise Barrier Puts Arizona Town Council Against the Wall

PUBLICATION: The Arizona Republic
DATE: May 28, 1999
SECTION: North Phoenix Community; Pg. 3
BYLINE: by Jeffry Nelson
DATELINE: Peoria
ACTIVISTS, INDIVIDUALS, AND GROUPS MENTIONED: Rebekah Coty, Peoria resident;

The Arizona Republic reports that a city councilwoman in Peoria wants the town council to approve a bid for a block wall between a busy avenue and nearby homes with acre-plus lots. Her proposal is controversial because she would be one of the wall's biggest beneficiaries.

According to the article, council members, who wanted to avoid the perception of using taxpayer money for the benefit of a council member tabled the matter until after Coty's term on the council ends.

The article quotes councilman Ken Forgia as saying that he couldn't vote to put a block fence in front of Coty's house as long as she is a council member because it could be perceived that the they was doing it just of who she is.

According to the article, Coty asked her council members to assume control of all $27,963 in the Pine District budget and spend it on a block wall between 93rd and 95th avenues on the southern side of Olive Avenue. The block wall would front her home and those of two neighbors.

The article reports that Coty emphasized that some type of action is needed to protect the development from the noise coming from traffic on a nearby busy avenue, which has two lanes going in each direction, and includes a turning lane in the center.

"This community is being inundated with a tremendous amount of noise, " she said. "The noise is constant.

According to the article, Coty said the noise has diminished the value of her property and others throughout the 40-lot West Olive Farms community. She added that people buy the acre-size lots in order to live in an agrarian setting. "We live on acreages for a rural lifestyle, but we have city noise," she said.

The article reports the development did have pine trees and cactus as a partial barrier from the noise, but a county road project in 1990 removed them and they were never replanted or replaced.

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City Council Approves Noise Abatement Policy

PUBLICATION: Bangor Daily News
DATE: May 27, 1999
BYLINE: Roxanne Moore Saucier
ACTIVISTS, INDIVIDUALS, AND GROUPS MENTIONED: BIA Director Bob Ziegelaar; BIA airport Marketing Director Jeff Russell

BANGOR - According to the Bangor Daily News, city councilors on the airport committee approved a noise abatement policy for Bangor International Airport (BIA).

The article stated that BIA Director Bob Ziegelaar stated that the policy has been in effect and followed for the past two years for flight training and engine testing, but is now official and universally applicable.

The article reports that the policy includes:

Engine testing prohibited between 10 p.m. and 6 a.m. and approaches and landings for trainings, prohibited between 9:30 p.m. and 5:30 a.m. According to the article, fines up to $1,000 per occurrence will be levied against violators.

The article states that violaters must contact the BIA if operators need a waiver or have problems adhering to the new restrictions.

The article explains that the airport's goal is to work closely with those who use the airport, as well as helping to maintain quiet neighborhoods in the airport's flight path.

According to the article, the airport will work with commercial airlines and the military regarding the new restrictions because the Federal Aviation Administration does supervise specific operations.

The Daily News reports that airport officials sent letters to various military bases that sometimes send noisy aircraft to Bangor.

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How Loud Can Sound Be?

PUBLICATION: The Hartford Courant
DATE: May 27, 1999
SECTION: Main; Pg. A15
BYLINE: The Hartford Courant
DATELINE: Connecticut
ACTIVISTS, INDIVIDUALS, AND GROUPS MENTIONED: Deafness Research Foundation

Sound, which is measured in decibels (dB), ranges from normal conversation (50-60 dB) to the loudest sound tolerated by the human ear (+120dB), according to the Hartford Courant. The article cites several examples of different sounds that we hear in the course of a normal day. A soft whisper measures 30 dB. Trains can produce a sound measuring as high as 93 dB about 100 feet in advance. An alarm clock at two feet measures 80 dB. Immediate danger to the human ear is 120 dB--sound levels from a thunderclap or sitting in front of speakers at rock concerts.

Federal Railroad Administration officials, reports the Courant, say a train traveling 45 miles per hour or greater would produce a sound measuring a maximum of 93 dB. The article goes on to say that FRA regulations require train warning horns to be set no less than 96dB, to be heard 100 feet in advance. The article lists several other sounds that we hear: 30 dB--a quiet ibrary or soft whisper; 70 dB--busy traffic, noisy restaurant. At this level, reports the Courant, noise your hearing is affected if exposure is constant. Subways, heavy urban traffic, an alarm clock at two feet, and factory noise all measure 80 dB.

These noises are dangerous if you are exposed to them for more than eight hours. A chain saw, stereo headphones, pneumatic drill measure 100 dB and, according to the article, if you are exposed to two hours of those noises, it's dangerous to your hearing.

Sound at a Rock concert in front of speakers, sandblasting, thunderclap measure 120 dB, and the danger is immediate, reports the Courant. At 120 dB, the article reports, exposure can injure your ear. A gunshot blast and a jet plane measure 140 dB, and the article reports that any length of exposure time is dangerous and may be painful. At 180 dB, the sound at a rocket launching pad, noise at this level causes irreversible damage unless you wear ear protection and hearing loss is certain. The Hartford Courant data on decibel level was compiled by the Deafness Research Foundation for BlueCross and BlueShield of Massachusetts

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Noise Control for Mines Criticized by Republican Senator

PUBLICATION: Am Cycle
DATE: May 27, 1999
SECTION: State and Regional
BYLINE: by Anick Jesdanun, Associated Press Writer
DATELINE: Washington

Associated Press reports Sen. Michael B. Enzi, R-Wyo., chairman of the Senate subcommittee on employment, safety and training is questioning the Clinton administration's proposal to require that mine operators protect workers from noise by buying quieter machines or rotating employees.

The article reports that under the proposed rules, operators would have to exhaust all engineering and administrative options before they can resort to using earplugs to meet noise -reduction requirements. The proposal was issued in 1996 to help protect miners from work-related hearing loss. The Mine Safety and Health Administration is considering whether to make any changes before finalizing the rules.

"I have read through this rule several times now, and I have to say that it makes no sense to me," said Sen. Michael B. Enzi, R-Wyo., chairman of the Senate subcommittee on employment, safety and training. "I seriously question whether those who wrote this rule have ever actually been to a mine."

The articles notes that critics of the proposal say it imposes unnecessary cost and is particularly burdensome to small mine operators. They say noise-protection rules for other industries are not as strict.

The regulations would help prevent about 30,000 cases of hearing loss. Without the changes, he said, about 46,000 miners can expect to incur serious hearing loss during their lifetime.

Joseph A. Main, a health and safety administrator with the United Mine Workers of America, said earplugs do little to protect hearing.

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Previous week: May 16, 1999
Next week: May 30, 1999

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Indexes

Aircraft Noise
Amplified Noise
Effects on Wildlife/Animals
Construction Noise
Firing Ranges
Health Effects
Home Equipment and Appliances
Industrial/Manufacturing
International News
Environmental Justice
Land Use and Noise
Lawsuits
Civil Liberty Issues
Miscellaneous Noise Stories
Noise Ordinances
Noise Organizations Mentioned
Outdoor Events
Noise in Our National Parks/Natural Areas
Regulation
Residential and Community Noise
Snowmobile and ATV Noise
Research and Studies
Technological Solutions to Noise
Transportation Related Noise
Violence and Noise
Watercraft Noise
Workplace Noise

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