Noise News for Week of April 16, 2000


Reno Military Watchdog Group Appeals Navy Warfare Sites on Public Land

PUBLICATION: Associated Press
DATE: April 20, 2000
SECTION: State And Regional
BYLINE: by Martin Griffith, Associated Press Writer
DATELINE: Reno, Nevada
ACTIVISTS, INDIVIDUALS, AND GROUPS MENTIONED: Rural Alliance for Military Accountability

An article by the Associated Press reported that an activist group in Reno plans to appeal a decision by the Bureau of Land Management (BLM) and Fallon Naval Station to place three electronic warfare sites and 22 mobile truck-mounted sites on public land in central Nevada.

The article said that Grace Potorti, director of the Reno-based Rural Alliance for Military Accountability plans to file the appeal with the BLM's Interior Board of Land Appeals in Washington, D.C.

The article said that Potorti considers the navy's plan to be "incremental military encroachment on public lands" with the sanction of the BLM, and the group is concerned about the noise impact. The article went on to say that the BLM and naval officials claim that the exercises will "cause no significant effects."

The article said the Navy will build the fixed sites Gabbs Valley in Edwards Creek Valley about 40 miles southwest of Austin. The 22 mobile sites will be spread out over four valleys, with a maximum of six sites in each one.

The article said that Potorti asked the Navy and the BLM to monitor the sound in the valleys to document noise levels," and shared her fears that the Navy will ask for more public land later on. "The problem is they're encroaching on public land little by little and it all adds up," she said.

The article quoted a spokesman for the Navy who disagreed, saying that "It all depends on the world situation and the American political environment. For her to assume we need more, it's highly speculative on her part. We ask for what we need."

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Calgary Night Club Owner Promises Little Late Night Noise

PUBLICATION: Calgary Herald
DATE: April 20, 2000
SECTION: City; B1 / Front
BYLINE: Robin Summerfield
DATELINE: Eau Claire, Alberta, Canada
ACTIVISTS, INDIVIDUALS, AND GROUPS MENTIONED: Eau Claire Community Association

The Calgary Herald reported on that the owner of a new sports night club has promised neighbors that his night club will not disturb them with late-night noise problems like a previous nightclub did.

The article went on to explain that according to the new club's owner, the sports-based club will attract an older, upscale clientele, and there'll be no dancing.

The article said that the Eau Claire Community Association approved the new 405-seat club called the Forum.

The article said that a previous club plagued residents with late-night noise and unruly patrons for over four years. Often police were called, and residents frequently complained to city officials.

The article said that owners of the previous club decided not to challenge the residents over the noise, and will reopen where noise isn't a concern.

The article said the owner hired an acoustics expert to review the club's interior design and structure to identify any problems.

The article said that some residents are skeptical about the club's claims that there will be no noise problems.

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Chicago Area Communities To Receive Soundproofing

PUBLICATION: Chicago Sun-Times
DATE: April 20, 2000
SECTION: Nws; Pg. 23
BYLINE: by Robert C. Herguth
DATELINE: Chicago area, Illinois

The Chicago Sun-Times reported that homes in communities near O'Hare Airport will receive soundproofing as part of a $30 million city-suburb program.

The article said that 850 homes are scheduled to receive soundproofing in Chicago, Bensenville, Chicago, Desplains, Elk Grove Village, Norridge, Northlake, Rosemont, Schiller Park, Wood Dale, and unincorporated DuPage County.

The article said the O'Hare Noise Compatibility Commission's residential sound insulation committee Wednesday chose which towns would participate in the program.

The article said that the committee required that homes that receive at least 70 dB of airport noise were included.

The cost per home is an average of $33,000 and the city of Chicago will use passenger tax revenues to pay for the soundproofing.

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Chicago's O'Hare Expansion Plans Fuel Debate Between Wealthy Corporations and Concerned Citizens

PUBLICATION: Chicago Daily Herald
DATE: April 20, 2000
SECTION: News; Pg. 1
BYLINE: Chris Fusco
DATELINE: Chicago, Illinois
ACTIVISTS, INDIVIDUALS, AND GROUPS MENTIONED: Suburban O'Hare Commission

The Chicago Daily Herald reported that a proposed new runway at O'Hare International Airport received support from wealthy corporations known for supporting political campaigns, but not from residents who live nearby.

The article said that the Civic Committee of the Commercial Club of Chicago released a report stating a projected growth in international air traffic requires that the airport review its runways. Executives from United and American Airlines, Allstate, Ameritech, Household International, McDonald's and Sears all support the proposed runway.

The article said that while executives support the proposal, opponents in the suburbs say the report underscores what they've been saying: the need for a third regional airport.

The article said that one Civic Committee member disagreed, saying that such an airport would threaten chances of attracting international flights.

The consulting firm that prepared the report, Booz-Allen & Hamilton Inc (that employs the disagreeing committee member) recognizes that jet noise is a politically-charged issue, and it wants to support politicians who vote in favor of the proposal.

The article explained that according to the consulting firm, Chicago is the strategic center of the country with hundreds of connecting flights elsewhere. If nonstop international flights increased, it would be inevitable that more firms would establish businesses in close proximity to O'Hare, which would mean more jobs and a significant economic impact.

The article went on to say that a citizen group opposed to the expansion, the Suburban O'Hare Commission, accused the firm of misleading the public. An attorney for the group emphasized that two "hub" airports are feasible, would bring more airlines to Chicago, and increase competition (resulting in lower ticket prices).

The article said that both the mayor of Chicago and the Federal Aviation Administration would have to be fierce advocates for the plan to succeed, and the final decision belongs to Illinois Governor George Ryan.

But, the article said, noise and pollution associated with airport expansion is a hot topic of debate. In addition to the Suburban O'Hare Commission, many other citizen groups are springing up, bringing the issues to the public. For example, Chicago has spent millions of dollars to soundproof homes and schools, and a special committee, the O'Hare Noise Compatibility Commission, was formed to address those issues--.

The article said that Chicago Mayor Richard Daley says no expansion is in store for O'Hare, [but the city has a plan to add gates and terminal space to meet a growth in international travel--at a cost of $4 billion].

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Experts Disagree on Noise Levels from Peaker Power Plant in Buffalo Grove, Illinois

PUBLICATION: Chicago Daily Herald
DATE: April 20, 2000
SECTION: News; Pg. 1
BYLINE: C.l. Waller
DATELINE: Buffalo Grove, Illinois

The Chicago Daily Herald reported that a proposed peaker power plant in Libertyville was the subject of a noise controversy at the 12th public hearing in the town of Buffalo Grove.

The article said that an engineering consultant for Indeck Energy Services Inc. claims that a 300-megawatt plant, fueled by natural gas in Libertyville, would have no noticeable change in existing noise levels.

The article said that an acoustics engineer hired by opponents challenged the company's engineer and took his own took sound measurements.

According to the article, the opponents' engineer explained that sound waves bend downward, and the more humidity, the less they are absorbed. Indeck's engineer used calm wind conditions, dry air and measured the sound 1.200 feet away from the plant.

The opponents' engineer were taken from 4,800 feet away and revealed that the plan would, indeed, impact existing noise levels.

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Expansion of Kroger's in Cincinnati Subject of Complaints

PUBLICATION: The Cincinnati Enquirer
DATE: April 20, 2000
SECTION: Metro, Pg. C03
BYLINE: Allen Howard
DATELINE: Cincinnati, Ohio

The Cincinnati Enquirer reported that the expansion of a Kroger store has drawn complaints from neighbors, businesses and city officials over noise and appearance.

The article said that installation of air conditioning and heating equipment is as noisy as a jet engine, and continues throughout the weekend, sometimes at 2am, disrupting neighbors sleep and the tranquility of the neighborhood in general.

According to the article, Kroger officials promised neighbors that no loud noises would be heard from either the loading dock or the utility units.

In addition, the article said, the structure is 45-feet tall, unsightly and not in keeping with colonial design of the other buildings in the shopping center, and not the construction plan Kroger submitted to city hall.

The article said city officials ordered the Kroger tear down the tower and abide by the plan it submitted. A Kroger spokesman claimed "a miscommunication about the height of the tower," and promised to correct the mistake.

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Increase in Flights at New York's LaGuardia Unauthorized and Neighbors are Angry

PUBLICATION: Daily News
DATE: April 20, 2000
SECTION: Suburban; Pg. 4
BYLINE: Albor Ruiz
DATELINE: New York
ACTIVISTS, INDIVIDUALS, AND GROUPS MENTIONED: Rose Marie Poveromo, spokesperson and president, United Community Civic Association; Natural Resources Defense Council

The New York Daily News reported that air and noise pollution in Queens are about to become worse unless officials act now. Within a year, an increase of 400 flights into and out of LaGuardia is expected, and residents are outraged.

The article quoted Rose Marie Poveromo, spokesperson and president of the United Community Civic Association in western Queens, as stating that none of the flights have been authorized. Why?

Even though a federal limit on the number of commercial flights in and out of LaGuardia has existed since 1968 ("high-density rule"), President Clinton recently signed a bill that permits new jets with 70 seats or fewer to fly into and out of LaGuardia. Major carriers want to expand as well.

The article said that residents object because the increase in flights poses a serious health risk. The article said that the Natural Resources Defense Council has classified LaGuardia as US airport with the most neighbors (150,000) affected by noise pollution.

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Proposed Racetrack near Detroit Prompts Foes to Ask for Noise Study

PUBLICATION: Detroit News
DATE: April 20, 2000
SECTION: Metro; Pg. 1
BYLINE: Darren A. Nichols
DATELINE: Hazel Park, Michigan

The Detroit News reported that proposed racetrack for the State Fairgrounds has motivated 20 determined residents to challenge the plan and the county commissioner. They've called for a study on both noise and traffic.

The article said that Oakland County Commissioner Ruel McPherson asked the Southeast Michigan Council of Governments (SEMCOG) to conduct a noise and traffic study similar to one done in 1996 when the racetrack was up for proposal. The plan was dropped.

But according to the article, the Michigan State Fair Advisory Board endorsed a plan which includes not only the racetrack, but also "438,000 square feet of convention space, an equestrian center, six theaters, a renovated Crystal Coliseum and two or three nearby hotels," angering the fairground's neighbors.

The article said that a noise pollution expert of 25 years warns that the proposed racetrack is a health hazard and compromise quality of life for its neighbors.

The article said that the mayor of Detroit approves the overall plans, but won't support the racetrack if the community doesn't.

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Overexposure to Noise Damages Hearing

PUBLICATION: Indianapolis Star
DATE: April 20, 2000
SECTION: Health; Pg. G01
BYLINE: Abe Aamidor

The Indianapolis Star reported that aging is not the only reason for hearing loss, and that overexposure to loud noise such as continual loud music and jet noise or sudden loud noises such as explosions and firecrackers can led to hearing loss as well.

The article listed other reasons such as head trauma, nerve deafness, sinus problems, and a genetic disposition to hearing loss are all factors.

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Residents in Washington State To Expect Loud and Late-Night Gun Fire

PUBLICATION: The News Tribune
DATE: April 20, 2000
SECTION: Pg. B2
BYLINE: David Wickert
DATELINE: Tacoma, Washington

The News Tribune reported that residents near Fort Lewis, Washington will expect late-night mortar fire from 1am through midnight on April 17.

Late-night firing at Fort Lewis will create increased noise from 1 a.m. Monday through midnight April 27.

The article said that soldiers participating in the training exercise will shoot 60 mm, 81 mm and 120 mm shells in preparation for combat.

the article said that I Corps Public Affairs Office is fielding noise complaints. That number is 253-967-0852.

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Construction Company in Tuen Mun, China Pays $400,000 for Repeatedly Ignoring Noise Complaints

PUBLICATION: South China Morning Post
DATE: April 20, 2000
SECTION: Pg. 4
BYLINE: Jennifer Ehrlich
DATELINE: Tuen Mun, China

South China Morning Post reported that the Chevalier Construction Company so often over the past two years that when it ignored four separate days of complaints because of jackhammering on Sundays and late at night, the Environmental Protection Department fined the company almost $400,000.

The article said that 156 convictions against the company were recorded in March for violating anti-pollution legislation. In addition, the article reported that "36 convictions were recorded by the Water Pollution Control Ordinance, 33 under the Noise Control Ordinance, 32 under the Air Pollution Control Ordinance, 54 under the Waste Disposal Ordinance, and one under the Dumping at Sea Ordinance."

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St. Bernard, Louisiana City Officials To Address Noise, Traffic and Parking Before Allowing Crawfish Festival To Take Place

PUBLICATION: Times-Picayune
DATE: April 20, 2000
SECTION: Metro; Pg. B02
BYLINE: Karen Turni
DATELINE: St. Bernard, Louisiana

According to the Times-Picayune, the St. Bernard Parish Council won't grant another three-year lease to the Louisiana Crawfish Festival until it reviews noise, traffic and parking problems that face its neighbors.

The article said the 25-year-old festival draws a crowd of about 85,000 people over a four-day period.

The article said that residents in one subdivision have asked the council to either prohibit festivals or be more responsible for noise control, and problems with traffic and parking problems affecting their neighborhood.

The article said that festival officials hope to meet with county officials to discuss rerouting and specific parking concerns.

The article said the lease costs $10,500 for four days.

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Chicago's O'Hare Airport Expansion Subject of Heated Controversy Because of Increase in Jet Noise

PUBLICATION: Chicago Tribune
DATE: April 20, 2000
SECTION: Editorial; Pg. 26; Zone: N
DATELINE: Chicago, Illinois

The Chicago Tribune printed an editorial about the expansion of O'Hare International Airport, its supporters and opponents. The editorial supports the expansion of the airport by adding a third runway.

The editorial reported that a group of the area's leading urged people to look at the "big picture," which is revenue from international commercial air traffic--a "burgeoning, multibillion-dollar business." Siding in favor of airport expansion and using a sports metaphor, the editorial emphasizes that Chicago, like Atlanta and Denver, has what it takes to play in the bigtime. The writer warned that Chicagoans who vote against the expansion will ruin a good deal.

The editorial referred to findings in "The Future of O'Hare," a report commissioned by the Civic Committee of the Commercial Club of Chicago. The editorial quoted from the commission's report stating that O'Hare,

The editorial also referred to projections from the Booz Allen & Hamilton consulting firm, which predicted that the Chicago area would forfeit a $10 billion economic impact and 110,000 new jobs if O'Hare does not expand to accommodate international traffic. In addition, the Committee wants construction of the third runway to begin immediately, and that has angered opponents.

According to the editorial, opponents of the expansion strenuously object to the Committee's recommendation to begin construction immediately and are fed up with jet noise and doubtful of claims that newer jets are quieter. The editorial said that residents, local officials (including the mayor of Bensenville, the president of the Illinois Senate and the House minority leader) and a coalition of democrats and republicans (including Rep. Jesse Jackson Jr. and Governor George Ryan) want new air traffic to go to Peotone Airport.

The editorial criticized the Civic Committee for not working out a political compromise, but acknowledged that the Committee recommends that Peotone serve as a point-to-point airport and O'Hare expand as a domestic and international hub. And that, according to the editorial, sounds suspiciously like mutual back-scratching. Chicago Mayor Richard Daley and the Clinton administration could free up the red-tape for Peotone as long as the state expanded O'Hare, which would increase noise abatement and soundproofing of homes, and "economically energize neighboring suburbs."

The article concluded by stating that the stalemate must end, and proposed a city-state airport authority whose job would be to oversee airport operations and enlist political clout for O'Hare, which the writer termed Chicago's number one enterprise.

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Illinois Towns Neighboring O'Hare International Angry Over United Airlines Recommendation for O'Hare Expansion

PUBLICATION: Chicago Tribune
DATE: April 20, 2000
SECTION: News; Pg. 22; Zone: N
BYLINE: Jon Hilkevitch, Rogers Worthington, John Schmeltzer
DATELINE: Chicago area, Illinois

According to the Chicago Tribune, United Airlines (the world's largest airlines) dropped a bombshell when it recently recommended construction of a new runway at O'Hare International Airport. According to the article, United has long stated that the airport could meet the demands of increased air traffic without expansion.

The article said that Chicago officials, disagree, claiming that the new runway is not needed now in order to remain competitive. [Chicago officials are planning a multibillion-dollar redevelopment of the airport to attract international air traffic.]

In addition, the article reported that mayors of neighboring suburbs are angry about the announcement because they have been working with the city and commercial airlines on issues such as jet noise and pollution. United's announcement came as an unpleasant surprise.

The article quoted Rita Mullins, mayor of Palatine, as saying that the announcement was " contrary to everything the O'Hare Noise Compatibility Commission has talked about." Arlington Heights Mayor Arlene Mulder expressed adamant opposition to an added runway.

The article reported that seven runways serve air traffic at O'Hare but the simultaneous use is restricted because of weather, or the types of aircraft landing. If another runway were used, air controllers would be able to leave three open for landings in all types of conditions.

According to the article, United claimed that heavy air traffic and delayed flights have increased dramatically throughout the nation in the past five years, bringing us to a critical stage.

The article added that United's announcement coincided with a report from the Civic Committee of the Commercial Club of Chicago advocating for a "immediate planning for construction of an additional runway at O'Hare," something the Chicago Department of Aviation disagrees with.

The article concluded with a quote from Virginia Kucera, an official in Arlington Heights. "They'll be meeting strong opposition from all the residents who live anywhere near O'Hare."

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Seattle Area Neighbors Pitted Against Each Other Because of Seattle-Tacoma Airport Flight Paths

PUBLICATION: Seattle Post-Intelligencer
DATE: April 19, 2000
SECTION: News, Pg. B2
BYLINE: Jack Hopkins P-I Reporter
DATELINE: Seattle area, Washington

According to a report by the Seattle Post-Intelligencer, over 300 angry residents attended a public hearing at a community center last night ordering city officials to kill the proposal that would put a flight path directly over their neighborhoods. The problem is, their neighbors in Beacon Hill, Madrona, Leschi and the Central Area already endure jet noise, and want support the proposal, which would channel some air traffic south.

The article said that residents in the Seattle area (Columbia City, Lakewood and Seward Park) promise to file suit in federal court if the Port of Seattle commissioners change the flight path accordingly.

The article said that a citizen advisory panel will vote on the proposal and port commissioners will vote in the summer.

According to the article, the Federal Aviation has the authority to create a new flight path, which will be "over the middle of Mercer Island after passing over southeast Seattle."

The article said that residents do not want to quarrel with their neighbors, and are resolute in their position that shifting the noise from neighborhood to another is not a solution.

More information about the proposal is available from reporter Jack Hopkins at 206-870-7851 or jackhopkins@seattle-pi.com

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New Louisiana Noise Ordinance Passes Constitutional Litmus Test

PUBLICATION: The Advocate
DATE: April 19, 2000
SECTION: News; Pg. 5-B;S
BYLINE: Marilyn Goff
DATELINE: Clinton, Louisiana

The Advocate reported that a new noise ordinance in East Feliciana Parish is constitutionally sound, resulting in the Police Jury's support.

The article said that at issue was noise from the Midway Motorcross Track

The former ordinance required a decibel level as part of the violation, and constitutional concerns were raised. The revised ordinance is based on health and sanitation codes, which prohibit interference with "the enjoyment of property or public peace and comfort."

The article said that parish Legal Counsel Mike Hughes affirmed that Baton Rouge officials passed an ordinance similar to the parish ordinance, and was constitutionally tested in Dallas.

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Personal Watercraft Industry Rejects Report by Noise Pollution Clearinghouse

PUBLICATION: Business Wire
DATE: April 19, 2000
DATELINE: Washington, D.C.

Business Wire printed the following press release about noise from personal watercraft and a report released by the Noise Pollution Clearinghouse. The press release is printed in its entirety.

According to Larry Lambrose, executive director of the Personal Watercraft Industry Association, a Noise Pollution Clearinghouse report on personal watercraft (PWC) noise that is scheduled to be released tomorrow is seriously flawed and based on erroneous assumptions and outdated information.

"This report is junk science at its worst. The underlying tone is clearly emotional and self-serving, rather than providing reasonable and responsible scientific research. By basing the foundation of the report on a lone 1993 sound study, the authors have ignored the billion-dollar investment marine engine manufacturers have made in recent years to make two-stroke engines significantly quieter and more environmentally friendly," stated Lambrose.

Despite recent sound improvements, personal watercraft sound has always fallen well under all applicable state and federal sound standards. In fact, many objective sound measurement studies show that even older model PWC are often among the quietest motorized powerboats on the water.

"Recent objective tests, including a study performed by the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Committee that will be published later this year, show that boats with single or twin outboard engines are louder than even older model personal watercraft," noted Lambrose.

Due to the marine industry's $1 billion investment in new engine technologies, year 2000 personal watercraft (PWC) are up to 70 percent quieter than 1998 models. Manufacturers are rerouting the exhaust systems and incorporating resonators that block and cancel out both intake and exhaust noise. These high-tech sound reduction techniques and others reduce watercraft noise significantly.

"Personal watercraft manufacturers have not ignored critic's noise concerns. In fact, they've responded very quickly and aggressively. With these high-tech engine advancements, even today's larger personal watercraft make less sound than your average powerboat," explained Lambrose.

"There will always be disagreements among the users of our waterways. It takes a truly biased extremist group to call for a total ban on one category of boats. This report is an outlandish extrapolation and manipulation of dubious data to connect lawful sound levels with alleged economic hardship," continued Lambrose.

Despite the fact that PWC emit sound levels similar to other boats, sound does continue to be a source of conflict. This is largely due to use patterns, and can best be mitigated through stringent enforcement and consumer education on operating their vessels in a courteous manner.

The PWIA endorses the use of shoreline sound measurement laws, as contained in the National Marine Manufacturers Association Model Noise Law and the establishment of slow-speed/no-wake zones near shore for all boats.

In addition, PWC manufacturers will continue their national communications programs that seek to educate users about courteous use practices that can reduce impacts to shoreline residents and recreationists.

For more information about personal watercraft, visit the PWIA web site at pwia.org.

CONTACT: PWIA, Washington, D.C. Sean Foertsch, 202/721-1643 (Media)

URL: http://www.businesswire.com

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Los Angeles Buys Homes Near LA International Airport

PUBLICATION: Copley News Service
DATE: April 19, 2000
SECTION: State And Regional
BYLINE: Shante Morgan
DATELINE: Los Angeles

An article from Copley News Service reported that the LA City Council approved a $7 million voluntary buyout of 15 single-family houses and two duplexes Manchester Square, which neighbors the airport. The vote was unanimous.

The article said the buyout was the third such purchase as part of a program to buy properties that have been adversely impacted by jet noise.

The article said that a $300 million fund from fees collected through airline ticket sales supports the program.

The article listed criteria for eligibility: financial emergencies, medical ailments and overcrowding. In addition, a homeowner can choose to sell a home than receive money for soundproofing.

The article said that certified appraisers independent of the program list purchase prices. This buyout featured homes valued from $238,000 to $315,000.

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Jet Noise at NYC's LaGuardia Airport Approaching Unbearable and Borough Officials Say No to Additional Air Traffic

PUBLICATION: Daily News
DATE: April 19, 2000
SECTION: Suburban; Pg. 1
BYLINE: by Warren Woodberry, Jr.
DATELINE: New York City

According to the Daily News, Queens Borough President Claire Shulman said that an increase in air traffic will make life unbearable for residents in boroughs near LaGuardia Airport if the projected flight increase in the hundreds is approved. LaGuardia air traffic is currently at 1,200 flights a day.

The article said that Shulman met Continental and Federal Aviation Administration officials to deliver her message of concern over the projected increase, having already met previously with Delta and Port Authority of New York and New Jersey [which operate LaGuardia].

The article said Shulman acknowledged that the increase will be an economic boon for the airlines, but will result in "diminishing."

Officials from Port Authority warn that if more flights aren't added, travelers will experience more delays, which means more complaints.

The article said that Shulman also acknowledged that both LaGuardia and Kennedy International "provide over 50,000 direct jobs and generate billions of dollars in economic activity," but called for a balance between economic gain and the quality of life for over 150,000 people who live near LaGuardia.

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Detroit Area State Fairgrounds Redevelopment Not Supported by Everyone

PUBLICATION: Detroit News
DATE: April 19, 2000
SECTION: Metro; Pg. 8
DATELINE: Detroit area, Michigan

The Detroit News printed these responses to a cyber survey regarding redevelopment of the state fairgrounds. The responses are printed in their entirety.

From: Teague Orblych

City: Detroit

E-mail: teague.91@gateway.net

"Whatever development the city can get is great, especially the kind that won't take from the taxpayers. As far as those complaining about the noise I just can't believe the pettiness. It's really not that big of deal and definitely not worth losing such a large development. For this development to not be embraced with open arms is ludicrous."

From: D. Harold

City: Detroit

E-mail: beverlyweis@aol

"I say no. I am sure this Nederlander guy is going to get some tax breaks and assistance with the cost of construction. Detroiters don't need favors like this."

From: Loretta Cheek

City: Detroit

E-mail: loricheek@ameritech.net

"Renovation of the fairgrounds would be nice -- hotels would not. I don't see any reason for hotels at the Fairgrounds. I think it would demean the whole reason for the grounds being there. Adding a racetrack is not a bad idea since there was a racetrack there originally. Adding hotels and fancy theaters would only be to encourage the idle rich suburbanite, not the working class."

From: Joanne Gleason

City: Dearborn Heights

E-mail: jgleason@bignet.net

"The people who live near the Michigan State Fairgrounds have already said that they don't want a racetrack in their neighborhood. Let Mr. Nederlander put his racetrack in his back yard."

From: George Olds

City: Dearborn

E-mail: GOlds91247@cs.com

"I really believe it would be great to have something of this nature in Detroit. The noise will not be a problem, no one is racing at night. I really believe there is more noise coming from Eight Mile Road and Woodward. After all, Michigan is the Motor Capital of the World, why not have a speedway to showcase it?!"

From: Roger B. Dowd

City: Trenton

E-mail: rogerbdowd@hotmail.com

"This area is long overdue for development. It is a perfect location for this type of complex. It is centrally located and can be accessed from any area of Metro Detroit. I myself am looking forward to this project and I plan to frequent the various venues that will be offered."

From: Lew Walter

City: Dexter

E-mail: walterlwalterusa@netscape.net

"It is baffling that there are forces in Detroit opposed to the proposed developments at the Michigan State Fairgrounds. Frankly, it seems amazing that anybody interested in Detroit's future would be anything but supportive of investing in that city, which until recently was barely above the level of a burnt out shell of a great city."

From: Joe Neal

City: Detroit

E-mail: jneal3@ford.com

"The racing season in Michigan is essentially only four months long, so a majority of summer weekends will be disrupted by racing and practice noise. If putting a racetrack near existing homes was such a great idea, I'm sure there'd be one in the suburbs already, with all the wide open spaces and cheap land out there. This is a bad, insensitive plan."

Cyber Survey

"The Nederlander Entertainment Group is going forward with an $80-million development plan for the Michigan State Fairgrounds that includes a racetrack, convention space, an equestrian center, six theaters, a renovated Crystal Coliseum and two or three hotels. Does this sound like a good plan? 68%: Yes 31%: No

The cyber survey acknowledged that it was non-scientific and that 385 Detroit News Online readers responded.

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North Carolina Residents Suspicious of FedEx Hub Business at Triad Airport

PUBLICATION: High Point Enterprise
DATE: April 19, 2000
BYLINE: by Paul B. Johnson
DATELINE: High Point, North Carolina

The High Point Enterprise reported that a state representative visited the Indianapolis International Airport resulted in his having serious concerns regarding the impact of a FedEx cargo hub might have on the Piedmont Triad International airport and its neighbors.

Steve Wood represents towns that under the flight path of FedEx planes landing at the airport, and wants both residents and community officials to investigate the impact that jet noise will have on property values.

The article said that city officials plan to visit the Indianapolis International Impact, but have not determined a date.

Attorney and hub critic John Burns wants city officials to glean factual information from their trip including the impact of noise and pollution. According to the article, opponents of the project (led by residents from north High Point and western Greensboro) worry that the FedEx hub will increase levels of air, water and noise pollution.

The article explained that those who support the project claim that a FedEx cargo hub will mean a positive economic impact on the community, adding that FedEx will "mitigate the potential environmental effects of the hub operation."

The article said that Wood stayed at a hotel four miles from the FedEx hub, and between 3 and 4 am, heard 34 flights that ranged from light to "teeth jarring."

In addition, Wood said that an Indianapolis homeowner reported a drop in the value of his property of $ 23,000 in 1999 because of its proximity to the hub.

The article said Wood, has opposed the FedEx when it was announced in 1997 and called for Piedmont Triad International Airport Authority to include a minimum of one appointee from neighborhoods near the airport.

Behning promoted similar legislation when FedEx began operations in Indianapolis.

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Moving Florida Airport Topic of Debate

PUBLICATION: Jupiter Courier
DATE: April 19, 2000
SECTION: Business; Pg. A10
BYLINE: Martin Drummond
DATELINE: Stuart, Florida

The Jupiter Courier reported that a real estate broker who lives under the flight path of 760-acre Witham Field airport has proposed moving the airport to a site in western Martin County and use the current site to build a major business complex. His plan is now the subject of an invigorating debate.

The article said that Bill Shanley helped to found the Witham Airport Action Majority (WAAM), a group calling for denying airliner-sized private jets from landing at the airport.

One vocal opponent to Shanley's plan for the airport is the executive director of the Stuart/Martin County Chamber of Commerce, Joe Catrambone.

According to the article, Catrambone was quoted as saying that residents voiced significant opposition in the past when just such an idea was proposed.

The article said that Shanley admitted that such a project is a major shift in the current philosophy for land use and would be expensive to taxpayers, but that the alternative would mean more people leaving the community.

Real estate appraiser Dan Deighan claims that such a project could mean as much as $8 million a year in property tax revenue.

The article said business opponents claim that moving the airport would result in complaints from other people, and would have an adverse economic impact on the local economy, which is supported partly by the increase in air traffic activity.

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LA City Council Compromises on Jet Noise Restriction

PUBLICATION: Los Angeles Times
DATE: April 19, 2000
SECTION: Metro; Part B; Page 7; Metro Desk
BYLINE: Annette Kondo
DATELINE: Los Angeles, California

The Los Angeles Times reported that the LA City Council's move to impose a stricter limit on new air traffic at Van Nuys Airport [the busiest airport in the country] is significantly short of the original proposed ban requested by the airport's neighbors.

The article said that the ordinance exempts some 50 jets built before 1985, but imposes strict limits on replacing existing Stage 2 aircraft, which are noisier than the newer models.

The article said that the compromise has left people on both sides of the issue disgruntled after over 20 years of heated debates over jet noise.

The article quoted Gerald Silver, president of Stop the Noise, a coalition of homeowners groups. "Homeowners don't like it. "It doesn't go far enough."

Also expressing displeasure was Jeffrey Gilley of the National Business Aviation Association, saying that some companies would be lose out because their fleets include older jets.

The article said that residents are also upset because the new ordinance permits the older and noisier aircraft to operate until Jan. 1, 2011.

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Ohioans Ready to Take Legal Action Against Jet Noise from Cleveland International Airport

PUBLICATION: Plain Dealer
DATE: April 19, 2000
SECTION: Metro; Pg. 3B
BYLINE: by Janet Tebben; PLAIN DEALER Reporter
DATELINE: Parma, Ohio

According to the Plain Dealer, noise complaints from residents near Cleveland Hopkins International airport are on the rise, and a local city councilwoman called for legal action.

The article said that councilwoman Susan Straub recommended hiring a lawyer with expertise in regulatory law to help residents who are subjected noise from the nearby airport.

The article said that plans for the airport's expansion could mean an increase in noise, and that concerns Straub, especially since the impact on Parma residents was not considered. Construction is scheduled this year.

The article said that Kate Hubben, airport spokeswoman acknowledged that there weren't any suggestions for Parma but stated that newer jet engines were quieter.

The article said that the expansion plan includes changing night flight as well as having a wider area for flights, which will spread the noise out over more neighborhoods [Editor's Note: the latter would pit neighbor against neighbor].

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Local Planner Dismisses Environmental Impact of Proposed California Race Track and Urges City Council to Approve

PUBLICATION: Press-Enterprise
DATE: April 19, 2000
SECTION: Local; Pg. B01
BYLINE: Michael Mcbride
DATELINE: Norco, California

The Press-Enterprise reported that a Norco planner dismissed the environmental impact of a proposed 125-acre race track that will include a satellite betting operation and entertainment center.

And that statement should be approved formally, King says in a memo to the city's Planning Commission. The article said that the Planning Commission will hold a public hearing, but if the city council approves the project at the commission's urging, there will be no report on the environmental impact of traffic or air and noise pollution.

According to the article, Eastville, the site of the proposed racetrack, is in an unincorporated county, which means that before the Norco City Council can approve the racetrack, the Riverside County Local Agency Formation Commission has to approve Eastvale's annexation.

The article said that Norco residents are divided in their support of the project, some residents of Eastvale are vigorously opposed.

According to the project, the racetrack, betting operation and entertainment center would have over 2,000 parking spaces, with another 166 for employees.

Finally, according to the article, a memo from the Planning Commission promises that the public address system and concert music will have minimal environmental impact, and a capacity crowd of 5,000 people will create an "appropriate noise level in a residential area."

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Florida Residents Say Private Planes Not Commercial Are Too Noisy

PUBLICATION: Press Journal
DATE: April 19, 2000
SECTION: Indian River County; Pg. A3
BYLINE: Henry A. Stephens
DATELINE: Vero Beach, Florida
ACTIVISTS, INDIVIDUALS, AND GROUPS MENTIONED: Nancy Wood

The Press Journal reported on complaints against jet noise at Vero Beach Municipal airport, but this time the complaints are against private aircraft rather than commercial.

The article said local activist Nancy Wood complained that the city's noise ordinances are applied only to commercial aircraft, a statement that netted applause from a capacity audience. The article said the mayor will hold a special workshop to meet with Wood and her neighbors.

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Rhode Island Night Club Owners Appeal Noise Violation: Claim it is Unconstitutional

PUBLICATION: Providence Journal-Bulletin
DATE: April 19, 2000
SECTION: News, Pg. 3C
BYLINE: Bob Jagolinzer
DATELINE: Johnston, Rhode Island

According to an article in the Providence Journal-Bulletin, the Town Council suspended a local business for violating an after-hours noise ordinance, but stayed the suspension when a Superior Court judge issued a temporary restraining order allowing the club to operate until a new court hearing.

The article said that Gene and Michael Marocco, owners of Club Starzz, were found guilty in Municipal Court of violating the town's noise ordinance, and the owners appealed to Superior Court. The article said that the East Greenwich police measured the noise at 71 decibels.

The article said that the owners are not only challenging their noise violation, they're also filing suit stating that the after-hours noise ordinance violates their constitutional rights.

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Rhode Island Town's New Ordinance is Tougher but Will it Work?

PUBLICATION: Providence Journal-Bulletin
DATE: April 19, 2000
SECTION: News, Pg. 1C
BYLINE: Sam Nitze
DATELINE: Bristol, Rhode Island

The Providence Journal-Bulletin reported that the Town Council in Bristol asked residents to identify areas in their neighborhoods and throughout the town that are noise problems.

The article said that of special concern are bikers with inordinately loud exhausts, boom cars and noisy late night parties.

The article said that the problem with the town's 1998 noise ordinance was that it pertained only to noises that, according to the Rhode Island American Civil Liberties Union, were annoying, and held that it was unconstitutionally vague.

Now the town has a new noise ordinance and the police department has a noise meter to lend strength to enforcement, some say that it's still not enough because getting to the scene to measure the noise means a possibility of getting there after the noise source has gone. And, according to the article, some residents want the town to launch a public relations campaign. Some suggestions are: announcing the campaign widely and police visits to schools.

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San Jose Activist Group Battles Major Construction Project by Caltrain

PUBLICATION: San Jose Mercury News
DATE: April 19, 2000
SECTION: State And Regional News
BYLINE: by Janice Rombeck
DATELINE: San Jose, California

According to the San Jose Mercury News, a new activist group, Citizens against Caltrain Lenzen Maintenance Facility, is taking the lead in the continuing battle to prevent the company from building a 24-acre railroad maintenance facility in San Jose's historic district.

The article said that opponents of the project object to noise from night workers as well as train engine exhaust during refueling, and submitted a petition against the company signed by over 400 residents.

The article said that a significant number of protesters currently endure noise and air pollution from the San Jose International Airport and Highway 880.

According to the article, other protestors say they were never informed that the facility would be built so close to their homes.

Of special concern to the new group is that an Environmental Impact Report (EIR) is not included in the plans, simply an environmental assessment done by the board that runs the company. The article said the company refused to conduct an EIR because of cost, construction delays, adding that it would produce no major difference in data.

The article said that residents are preparing for the worst, that the construction will happen, and are planning how to mitigate the adverse impact by holding monthly meetings.

According to the article, Caltrain is investigating noise abatement measures such as sound walls, building insulation, performing the noisier tests indoors and using "smaller engines to move around cars within the yard," said Rita Haskin, Caltrain spokeswoman. She added that "Caltrain is working on electrifying trains," (which, in the future, would eliminate fuel storage and refueling altogether).

The article said that the city and Caltrain will sign a "memo of understanding," which is a legally binding document to strengthen the noise and pollution mitigation plans.

According to the article, Caltrain officials claim that they looked at six sites for the facility, and San Jose was the best for their needs. The facility will maintain 25 diesel locomotives and 100 passenger cars, and the facility will be a four-story building 1,000 feet long by 100 feet wide. The article said that the majority of the work and fueling will be done outside at night, and twice a month workers will test engines at full power for ten minutes.

The article gave the following information for contacting the activist group: The Citizens Against Caltrain Lenzen Maintenance Facility has a Web site at www.stopcaltrain.com.

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Florida Nightclub Meets Noise Complaints with Louder Music

PUBLICATION: St. Petersburg Times
DATE: April 19, 2000
SECTION: Hernando TIMES; Pg. 1
BYLINE: Jennifer Farrell
DATELINE: Spring Hill, Florida

According to the St. Petersburg Times, the owners of Plant Bubba in Hernando County, vow to crank up the music more nights during the week when county commissioners strengthen existing noise ordinances.

The article said that club owners Richard Fabrizi and a local radio disk jocket named "Bubba the Love Sponge" Clem will expand the club, have more speakers, remain open seven days a week, and sponsor teen night Sunday through Tuesday.

The article said that the dispute among residents, county officials and the club's owners is a year-old. After a violent stabbing incident at the club, the sheriff instructed off-duty officers not to work at the club, claiming the owners were not interested in law enforcement.

The article quoted club owner Fabrizi as saying "I hope it goes to the Supreme Court. We're going to take it as far as we can take it."

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Small St. Louis Airport Too Busy to Grow

PUBLICATION: St. Louis Post-Dispatch
DATE: April 19, 2000
SECTION: News, Pg. A1
BYLINE: Ken Leiser
DATELINE: St. Louis, Missouri

According to the St. Louis Post-Dispatch, the Spirit of St. Louis airport is the source of residents' complaints of noise and safety. The article said that the airport, once a small, recreational airport is now the third-busiest in the four-state area.

The article said that airport director Richard Hrabko, (a former city council member) says that while airport officials are "sensitive" to complaints, the number is low compared to reliever airports in other states, whose complaints number in the thousands. The article said that two years ago, airport officials logged 160 noise complaints and 146 last year. To date, Hrabko says the complaints number 30.

The article says the airport has a voluntary noise-reduction program, and that the Federal Aviation Administration refused his request to direct more air traffic north of the airport.

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Floridians Say Trains Noisier Than Airplanes

PUBLICATION: Stuart News/Port St. Lucie News
DATE: April 19, 2000
SECTION: Letters To The Editor; Pg. A10
DATELINE: Stuart, Florida

The Stuart News/Port St. Lucie News printed this letter to the editor responding to complaints from complaints about airport noise. The letters are printed in their entirety.

Editor:

For months now I have been reading all of the complaints about Witham Field. Witham Field was an airport before all of the condos were in place.

Didn't the condo owners notice there was an airport nearby? Why did they choose a home right next to an airfield? There are many other apartments in the area; but no, they choose the one adjacent to an active airport.

If you really want to complain about noise, how about the railroad that runs right through the heart of Stuart? At all hours of the night, the train whistles blow. Every single intersection gets at least three long blasts, and this goes on right through the whole city without a letup. This racket lasts at least four minutes per train, and on the average night you can hear about five to eight trains, sometimes more.

On Friday evening, April 2, at 10:30, I was at the intersection of Monterey and A1A. That train had 132 cars. You can imagine how much noise this generated, and it went on past the lovely homes and properties throughout our city.

So let's face it, an airplane takes off and within a minute the noise is gone. Most of this noise occurs in the daytime. When the trains howl through, it is during the time one should be getting a good night's rest. Pity the poor school children who should be sleeping blissfully; instead they are awakened time and time again with this racket.

So we all have our cross to bear.

Donna Lancour

Stuart

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English Pioneer of Aeroacoustics and Noise Control in Aircraft Dies

PUBLICATION: The Times
DATE: April 19, 2000
SECTION: Features
DATELINE: London, England

The London Times printed a feature article about the death of a distinguished mathematician, Aeroacoustics specialist and expert in aircraft engine noise, Sir David Crighton.

The article focused on Crighton's career and accomplishments, giving a brief biography. Of special importance for noise activists is Crighton's study of noise control in aircraft design, especially noise from high-speed jet engines.

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Canadian Mayor Backs Skytrain Tunnel Option to Reduce Noise in Small Town of Port Moody

PUBLICATION: Vancouver Sun
DATE: April 19, 2000
SECTION: News; B1 / Front
BYLINE: Scott Simpson
DATELINE: Port Moody, Vancouver, Canada

The Vancouver Sun reported on a proposed tunnel extension under Port Moody, a self-described backwater town. At issue is the noise and visual impact that the SkyTrin has on the small city. They town's mayor told a capacity audience at a public hearing (sponsored by the Rapid Transit Project Office-RPTO) that a tunnel extension would reduce the impact.

Also of concern to Port Moody is the impact on a major industrial tenant and the salmon-bearing Schoolhouse Creek.

The article said that the project office submitted four options the tunnel section, where the train will travel underground for two of the 12 kilometers. All of the options fall within the $91 million budget.

According to the article, Joe Trasolini, Port Moody's mayor, wants the However, Trasolini hopes to persuade the RTPO will provide the additional money to extend the tunnel beyond the options given by the project office.

The article said one technical advisor suggested building stations that "trap sound during acceleration and deceleration of the trains."

The article said that the RTPO wants Port Moody and the other cities involved to finalize their recommendations by June, at which time the RTPO staff and the Greater Vancouver regional district and transit authority TransLink will decide on the alignment of the line.

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Canadian Buses Too Noisy for Woman

PUBLICATION: Vancouver Sun
DATE: April 19, 2000
SECTION: News; B2
BYLINE: Kevin Griffin
DATELINE: Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada

The Vancouver Sun reported a complaint from a woman who says that diesel buses make more noise than the electric trolley buses from previous years.

The article said quoted Ken Hardie, a spokesman for the regional transit authority, as saying that diesel buses are used because they meet accessibility requirements for people who use wheelchairs as well as others who had difficulty climbing steps in the older 'high floor' trolleys.

The article added that the current diesel buses meet the residential noise level of 83 decibels (dB), but at 81 dB, they are as quiet as the technology allows.

The article explained the measures the transit authority has taken over the years to help mitigate the noise: installation of a second muffler on the high floor buses and modifying the exhaust on the low-floored buses.

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New Jersey Town Council Approves Flight Path Shift

PUBLICATION: Asbury Park Press
DATE: April 18, 2000
SECTION: B, Pg. 4
BYLINE: James a. Broderick
DATELINE: Middletown, New Jersey

The Asbury Park Press printed a number of special interest articles about Middletown, including this article about the Middletown Township Committee's adoption of a resolution proposed by the anti-noise group New Jersey Coalition Against Aircraft Noise. According to the article, the group wants to shift air traffic at Newark International Airport over the Shore area rather than over the North Jersey metropolitan area.

The article said the group asked the state Legislature to approve a six-month test of the detour.

The article said that Mayor Rosemarie D. Peters doesn't like the proposal because she said it increase air traffic as well as noise and air pollution.

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California City Council Limits Older, Noisier Aircraft: Aviation Group Files Suit

PUBLICATION: City News Service
DATE: April 18, 2000
DATELINE: Los Angeles

City News Service reported that the Los Angeles City Council voted in one body to limit the number of the older, noisier Stage 2 aircraft at Van Nuys Airport, and will phase out the older planes (made before 1984) by 2010.

The article said that for twenty years, the airport's neighbors have fought powerful businesses that claim stricter noise rules would compromise the local economy.

The article said that city council members acknowledged that the vote didn't go as far as anti-noise advocates wished, but it did prevent the noise from getting worse.

According to the article, the Van Nuys Airport Business Association, who will file suit against the city council, claiming the ordinance violates the FAA's mandate that local airport restrictions be reasonable and non-discriminatory.

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Colorado Neighbors Want Quieter Home Remodeling

PUBLICATION: Denver Post
DATE: April 18, 2000
SECTION: Business; Pg. C-03
BYLINE: Emily Narvaes
DATELINE: Denver, Colorado

The Denver Post printed an article about home remodeling and the neighbors who endure the subsequent noise, trash and portable toilets--according to a spokesman for the city planning department. Most people want to know what the working hours are so concerned neighbors call the city to inquire--about 2,500 per year.

The article said that according to the planning department, out of 6,699 permits in 1999, 4,454 were issued for housing remodeling and repairs.

The article said that city planning employees spend about 700 hours a year answering questions about the rules for remodeling, noise and other pertinent information, which is now online at http://www.DenverGov.org/. The city's telephone number is 303-640-2736.

The article said that to promote even better relationships among builders and neighbors, the city distributes information to builders who, in turn, can notify the neighbors of projects to come.

According to the article, the information lists the location of , when it is scheduled, when the work is permitted, what the hours are as well as the requirements builders and contractors must meet.

The article listed the city's general guidelines for builders and residents. The list is printed in its entirety below:

Call or meet with as many neighbors as possible.

Mail a letter or fliers describing the construction.

Post a sign with a phone number for questions.

For contractors:

Limit high- noise operations to the middle of the day until the structure is fully enclosed; also limit radio noise.

Control dust.

Keep the Dumpster on the lot or on the street in the middle of the site.

Place portable toilets away from property lines.

Avoid damage to landscaping.

For neighbors:

Accept change in the neighborhood.

Recognize style is not regulated except in Historic Landmark Districts and overlay districts.

Expect construction to be noisy and messy, particularly at first.

Don't use the job-site Dumpster.

Be familiar with city rules and regulations regarding construction.

'Residents must recognize that noise and inconvenience is inevitable but temporary,' said Lois Court of the city's Office of Neighborhood Response. 'But contractors should try to minimize the noise and inconvenience during construction, thereby reducing the possibility of conflict with the neighboring residents.'

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Local Officials in Canada Meet With Federal Minister to Discuss Train Noise

PUBLICATION: The Gazette
DATE: April 18, 2000
SECTION: News; A6
BYLINE: Darren Becker
DATELINE: Cote St. Luc and Hampstead, Quebec, Canada

The Montreal Gazette printed an article about noise and pollution from trains that pass through Canadian cities. Town officials from Cote St. Luc and Hamstead are appealing to federal Transport Minister David Collenette for help.

According to the Gazette, Canadians complain that early morning train whistles and loud noise from trains shunting and idling on the tracks are waking disturbing their sleep and compromising their quality of life, motivating city mayors to request a meeting with the Collenette to discuss possible solutions.

The article went on to say that residents may not be satisfied with just a meeting, and are organizing a class-action lawsuit against the St. Lawrence & Hudson railway.

The article said that Cote St. Luc and Hampstead residents have formed a coalition, the We Want Railway Solutions Now committee, Cote St. Luc demanding the St. Lawrence & Hudson speed of passenger and freight trains passing through their towns. They also called for trains to stop running between midnight and 7 a.m.

Of particular interest, the article explained that coalition members have videos and photographs depicting how the trains are disrupting residents' quality of life. Both towns will combine funds to pay for a $5,000 study to monitor noise levels.

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Erroneous Planning Excludes Some Tennessee Homes From Noise Abatement Measures

PUBLICATION: Knoxville News-Sentinel
DATE: April 18, 2000
SECTION: Comment; Pg. A17
DATELINE: Knoxville, Tennessee

The Knoxville News-Sentinel printed this letter to the editor about the impact of an interstate highway on homes. Of special interest is the article's explanation of an error planning that resulted in a loss of noise abatement measures for one neighborhood. The letter is printed in its entirety.

Editor, the News-Sentinel:

The original number of homes impacted in the 1985 Environmental Impact Statement for the expansion of Interstate 40-75 was 14. These 14 homes were just the ones actually bordering Interstate 40-75 at that time, called front-row receptors.

The 1990 follow-up study on the same expansion project (not submitted to the EPA) erroneously reduced the 14 original homes to eight, citing that Papermill Road was between the six houses excluded and Interstate 40-75, so they wouldn't count.

However, the dated plans since 1989 have shown that Papermill Road won't be in that location when Interstate 40-75 is expanded, making that argument clearly false. Had those six houses remained in the 1990 study, Westwood would have qualified for noise barriers like they did in 1985, based on the costs calculated at that time. Now, even more houses are affected than before by the noise.

The current $25,000 Tennessee Department of Transportation noise abatement limit per house increases by 10 percent if more than 25 homes are affected. We believe that over 40 homes in Westwood qualify for noise abatement benefit at this time. Also, the justifiable range for noise abatement in the environmental policy is up to $50,000 per home.

Further, as we look at the six other noise barriers defined in 1985 but negated in 1990, it seems that each of the 1985 barriers changed in the 1990 study to become twice as long, half again as high, or would suddenly protect much fewer homes than were shown in 1985, making each of them no longer feasible.

I passed this data along to City Councilwoman Jean Teague, asking her to share it with other neighborhoods affected in her constituency and am hoping that each group will rally around their individual situations, pressing TDOT for correction of the math at each of the sites affected.

This is just one of the factors behind the Greater Bearden Area Neighborhood Preservation Coalition and the letter that was sent to TDOT by the five different homeowner groups.

Hayes Hickman is doing a wonderful job on covering this very complicated topic. Dealing with TDOT is like trying to hit a moving target with a water pistol.

We appreciate the efforts of everyone who is helping to cover this issue.

Joni Caldwell

Westwood Homeowner and

Traffic Committee Chairperson

Knoxville

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Burbank Airport Officials Delay Airport Expansion for Two Years: Noise Study to Come First

PUBLICATION: Los Angeles Times
DATE: April 18, 2000
SECTION: Metro; Part B; Page 1; Zones Desk
BYLINE: Andrew Blankstein
DATELINE: Burbank, California

According to the Los Angeles Times, Burbank Airport officials voted to conduct an in-depth noise study that may delay the construction of a $300 million airport complex for a minimum of three years. The article said extraordinary opposition to the expansion prompted the Burbank-Glendale-Pasadena Airport Authority to give up on beginning construction.

The article said that the study will include an analysis on a mandatory curfew on flights between 10 p.m. and 7 a.m.

The article said the aviation consulting firm of Landrum and Brown, based in Cincinnati, will conduct the review.

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Nightime Army Training in Ft. Lewis, Washington Means an Increase in Noise

PUBLICATION: The News Tribune
DATE: April 18, 2000
SECTION: Pg. B2
BYLINE: David Wickert
DATELINE: Ft. Lewis, Washington

According to the News Tribute, gunfire and demolition sounds will disturb nights for neighbors of Ft. Lewis as the army conducts nighttime combat training

The article gave a contact number for complaints: I Corps Public Affairs Office at 253-967-0852.

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North Carolina Man Asks for Clarity on Airport Contour Map

PUBLICATION: News & Record (Greensboro, NC)
DATE: April 18, 2000
SECTION: Editorial, Pg. A10
DATELINE: Greensboro, North Carolina

The News & Record printed this letter to the editor calling for clarification of the paper's reporting on the contour map of airport noise as printed in the April 7, 2000 edition. The letter is printed in its entirety.

"I need some help understanding the logic of the noise contours as published in your April 7 edition. The illustration shows that the northeast noise contour for the existing runway on the NE-SW option extends all the way to Horse Pen Creek Road (perhaps a mile - there is no scale). The southwest contour extends past Gallimore Dairy for about the same distance. The noise contour for the new parallel runway in this option extends roughly the same distance on the southwest contour but is dramatically shorter on the northeast side (it extends barely off the end of the runway and not as far as Muirfield in the Cardinal).

When I compare the noise contours on the NW-SE option, they are roughly symmetrical on both NW and SE and extend about the same distance as the noise contour for the current runway.

Logic would say that the northeast noise contour for the proposed new runway would be approximately the same as the others. Not being an engineer trained in the science of noise measurement, I would be interested to know how a professional trained in that science would explain what sort of acoustical phenomena makes the northeast noise contour, which points at the Cardinal, so small." Mike Crouch Greensboro

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Alaska Boom Cars Prompt Complaint

PUBLICATION: Anchorage Daily News
DATE: April 17, 2000
SECTION: Metro, Pg. 6B
DATELINE: Anchorage, Alaska

The Anchorage Daily News printed this letter to the editor about boom cars and neighborhood tranquility. The letter is printed in its entirety.

ASSAULT ON HEARING MUST END

"Lynn Kramer asks a very pertinent question ("Turn down the bass," Letters, April 12) about the inconsideration shown by people with automobile sound systems with loud bass sound that can be heard for blocks. Being inside or outside a building in the area doesn't matter. Your freedom from the excesses of others will be infringed upon.

I have one of these "neighbors," who invades my family's space five or six times daily with his noise pollution whenever he comes or goes, sometimes when his vehicle is just idling in his driveway. Based on the distance from my home to his, I estimate at least 130 other homes are subjected to noise emanating from his vehicle each time he runs it.

When someone smells bad, you can walk a few steps away for fresh air. If someone dresses like an idiot, at least you can look away. However, when your sense of hearing is assaulted in your home, there is little recourse other than the elimination of the source of the noise.

It is amazing that people who look like adults can have so little respect for the simple rights of others to live with a little peace and quiet. Speaking to the perpetrator in person solved nothing permanently. However, I discovered (and soon so will my "neighbor") that the Municipality of Anchorage has a noise and nuisance complaint line that can be reached at 343-4200. Maybe there is hope for my family and neighbors after all." -- Jim Prolsdorfer Anchorage

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Squeaky Floors and Foam Padding Relieve Harried Homeowner

PUBLICATION: Associated Press
DATE: April 17, 2000
SECTION: Lifestyle
BYLINE: by Popular Mechanics

The Associated Press printed this article about home repair on reducing noise in the floor from baseboard heat. The article is in question-and-answer form and is printed in its entirety.

Question: "We have hot-water baseboard heat and we get a constant knocking at both ends of the baseboard units when the heat is coming up and also when it's going down. Our house has upper and lower levels and a 2-level heating system."

Answer: "All piping materials expand and contract with temperature changes. A 50-foot length of copper pipe, any diameter, will expand in length more than one-half inch when the water inside is raised from 70 F to 170 F (typical for a baseboard heater). This expansion can strain joints and cause leaks. It can also make elements bind against radiator covers and jam risers against floorholes, causing noise. Even when provisions are made during installation to absorb this expansion, some noise may still come from the baseboard units.

The noise is probably caused by the heat distribution pipes or connecting fins rubbing on their support brackets as the pipes expand when the heat is coming up and as they contract when the heat is going down.

This noise can usually be eliminated or reduced by inserting foam rubber pads between the baseboard support brackets and the connector fins or distribution pipe, whichever is being supported. When inserting the pads, gently lift the heating pipes or fins. If you apply too much pressure, you can strain pipe joints and possibly crack them.

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France Close to Developing New Age Super Concorde: Noise Under Consideration

PUBLICATION: Aviation Week & Space Technology
DATE: April 17, 2000
SECTION: World News & Analysis; Vol. 152, No. 16; Pg. 36
BYLINE: Pierre Sparaco
DATELINE: Paris

According to the Aviation Week & Space Technology, the French are examining whether a successor to the Concorde would be feasible and competitive in the near future. Besides considering the financial feasibility, a task force overseeing five groups will focus on noise and emissions.

The article is technical, discusses research and development funding, and acknowledges that the new age super aircraft is still in the exploratory stage, without a market forecast or upgraded technology. Of importance in this article is that the technology must comply with "post-Stage 3 noise limitations and additional environmental constraints."

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Boeing 727 to Get Performance Upgrade

PUBLICATION: Aviation Week & Space Technology
DATE: April 17, 2000
SECTION: International Product News; Vol. 152, No. 16; Pg. 102
BYLINE: Paul Proctor
DATELINE: Seattle, Washington

Aviation Week & Space Technology printed an article about a modification kit for Boeing 727 aircraft that is compliant with Stage 3 "noise-attenuation system for increased and heavy-gross-weight 727s." The article is technical in nature, explaining that the kit allows shorter takeoffs and increased "payloads at 'hot and high' airports."

According to the article, since the kit is "a nonacoustic change, no difference in takeoff thrust is necessary."

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India Says It Must Control Population to Save the Environment: Noise Among Major Issues

PUBLICATION: Business Line
DATE: April 17, 2000
BYLINE: P. P. Sangal
DATELINE: India

An article in Business Line printed an article regarding the primary cause of pollution in India--overpopulation. Noise was a major concern.

The article calls for population control because of critical environmental issues such as noise, air and water pollution, soil degradation, deforestation, and wildlife extinction.

The article explained how each type of pollution is a result of just too many people in India: power plants and vehicular traffic (air pollution); industry (to meet the demands of an ever-increasing population), private enterprise and agriculture (water pollution); and urbanization, industry and vehicular traffic (noise pollution). activities

The article reminds us that at the same time overpopulation negatively impacts the environment in terms of pollution, overpopulation also depletes our precious resources.

The article said that Mumbai, India is the noisiest city in the world--92 dB at Chatrapati Shivaji train terminus. Delhi measures between 75-86 dbs. The article said the permissible limit is 55 dBs, and calls for population control.

The article makes recommendations for change, calling for governmental recognition of overpopulation as a detriment to the environment, and a commitment by NGOs and environmentalists to make public education about the benefits of population control.

The article said that these recommendations are the "...the only way of ensuring 'sustainable development' as mentioned in Agenda 21 of the 1992 Summit held in Rio De Janeiro."

The article said that the author is the consultant on Environment and Poverty Alleviation for the government of India.

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Chicago Area Residents Voice Opinions on Train Whistles

PUBLICATION: Chicago Sun-Times
DATE: April 17, 2000
SECTION: Nws; News Analysis; Pg. 6
BYLINE: Lynn Sweet
DATELINE: Chicago area, Illinois

The Chicago Sun-Times printed an article about train whistles, noise, liability and personal responsibility.

The article began with two quotations of differing philosophy before discussing the problem. The quotations are in quotations and list names after. They were both e-mail responses to the Federal Railroad Administration.

"In regards to train whistles: People who do not understand the importance of railroad crossing safety and choose to complain about the noise are all wet. I think that those whistles should blow and blow and blow some more." Anne Dakan (Elgin).

"If people ignore the signals and are injured, it's a matter of individual responsibility and not a problem that the government or local communities need to go any further to resolve. You must draw the line on cost and annoyance at some point." Michael Nelson, Libertyville.

The article said that among the myriad federal issues that the Chicago area faces, a proposal to eliminate local bans on train whistles is the most contentious. The article said that the proposal affects Illinois more than any other state in the nation.

According to the article, protests are coming from congressional representatives to city officials, especially in northeastern Illinois where the impact would be heaviest.

The article said the rules (declared in January, 2000) states that " local governments would have to upgrade safety at crossings, mostly at their expense, or risk repeal of laws barring locomotive noise."

According to the article, out of 1,978 crossings in the nation with whistle bans, 899 are in Illinois--primarily in Cook, DuPage, Lake, McHenry, Kane and Will counties.

However, despite the protest and outrage from city and elected officials, some people credit the whistles for saving lives. "I strongly support the use of locomotive horns at all road intersections," said Sidney Levin of Buffalo Grove.

A local transportation agency in the Chicago area objected to the rules because they go "...beyond the need for improvements along this corridor, which has a strong safety record and low accident history."

The article explained the dramatic differences of opinion about train noise: in 1988 public outrage against train whistles caused a hold on a state law that required train whistles, leading to a waiver of the rule in northeastern Illinois by the Illinois Commerce Commission.

The article said that despite such public opinion, a state representative , William O. Lipinski (D-Chicago), an influential member of the House Transportation and Infrastructure Committee, supports the rule.

The article framed the controversy simply: transportation analysts and researchers allege that the railroad administration estimated far short of the cost communities must pay to avoid whistle-blowing while they overestimated how the number of people affected and the number of lives saved.

The railroad administration disagrees, stating that communities have many solutions for maintaining quiet, including: photo enforcement, four-quadrant gates, median barriers and more police enforcement.

The article explained that the Chicago Area Transportation Study released a report that showed the cost for 899 crossings at "between $170 million and $234 million, depending on what options a community may choose, 'considerably higher than the (railroad administration) estimate of $116 million.'" The city's Transportation department estimates that 340,000 Chicago-area residents will be affected by train whistle noise.

In a report prepared for the state's congressional delegation, the city commented that "It is an unfunded federal mandate with no special federal funding to cover this expense."

The city's Transportation Department estimates that 340,000 city residents would be affected by train whistle noise.

The article said that last year, 25 fatalities and 64 injuries (11 in Illinois) were at railroad crossings with whistle bans. Across the United States in 1999, there were 25 fatalities and 64 injuries at crossings with train whistle bans.

The article explained the options city officials are considering: exemption from the new federal rules; obtaining federal money to pay for improvements; delay the program until a better idea comes along.

The article concluded that the railroad administration should expect a serious challenge, especially since two powerful representatives oppose the new rulings, and one heads the subcommittee with jurisdiction over train whistles.

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Some Residents in High Point, N.C. Like the FedEx Cargo Hub

PUBLICATION: High Point Enterprise
DATE: April 17, 2000
DATELINE: High Point, North Carolina

An article in the High Point Enterprise reported on some residents who support the proposed FedEx cargo hub project at Piedmont Triad International Airport, saying that personal imposition of noise should be weighed against a positive economic impact and job creation.

The article said that FedEx claims it will employ 1,500 at the mid-Atlantic hub, and hopes to open in five years. The article gave another reason some people support the hub: "prior use," or building homes knowing the airport was near.

According to the article, critics of the project allege that most residents will eventually oppose the project once they learn how the project will lead to increased air, water and noise pollution.

The article explained that over the past 20 years, development and growth have had an impact on the quality of life--farmland changed to shopping centers and suburbs.

The article gave the web site for the executive summary of the report: www.gsoair.org.

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UK City Officials Promote Tourism and Nightlife but Residents Say No

PUBLICATION: The Journal
DATE: April 17, 2000
SECTION: Issues, Pg. 11
DATELINE: Newcastle, England

The Journal reported that residents and restaurant/pub owners have two different views of Newcastle, England. Residents want more peace and quiet but the business community says the positive economic impact the nightlife brings is critical to the town's finances.

According to the article, the town realizes as much as 500,000 in revenue and 10,000 jobs for 50,000 visitors.

The article adds that some residents believe their quality of life is severely compromised.

The article explained that residents who live in the town's center experience public urination on their property, boisterous party goers leaving the pubs at early hours of the morning, and loud music waking them up late at night or early in the morning.

The article said that the Government's urban task force, the city council and the Grainger Town Project are reviving Newcastle's historic core and want to repopulate the city center.

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LaGuardia to Get 300 More Daily Flights

PUBLICATION: Newsday
DATE: April 17, 2000
SECTION: News; Page A03
BYLINE: by Michael Arena
DATELINE: New York City

According to Newsday, a new federal law may lead to the most significant increase in air traffic at LaGuardia Airport in decades--as many as 300 more flights a day. Safety and noise problems are of concern.

The article said that regional jet service at leading airlines is expect to increase over the next year, adding to the already heavy traffic of 1,000 daily take offs and landings. The heavy increase, the article said, has led to speculation about the usual concerns of delays, noise and safety.

The article said that long-established "access rules" previously forbade increasing the number of flights over heavy trafficked areas such as New York, Chicago and Washington, D.C., but recent legislation allows newer, regional aircraft with fewer than 70 seats will have "unrestricted access to airports such as LaGuardia."

And, the article said, Federal Aviation Administration officials claim controlling the increase in traffic will pose no problem. However, there are unidentified officials say that all depends on when the flights are scheduled--if they come during peak hours, serious problems will arise.

The article said that Port Authority officials claim it will minimize congestion and be sensitive to noise concerns for the airport's neighbors.

The article said that because noise was a major concern, leading politicians voted that only the newer, quieter jets will be eligible for the new service.

The article explained that officials from Queens and other boroughs have voiced serious concerns and objections over the expanded service.

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Newer Classrooms Noisy and Impede Learning in New Zealand

PUBLICATION: The Press
DATE: April 17, 2000
SECTION: News; National; Pg. 3
BYLINE: Ross Tara
DATELINE: Christchurch, New Zealand

According to the Press in New Zealand, a study resulting from teacher complaints showed that newly constructed school buildings are noisier than older ones, and listening conditions in the older builders were unsatisfactory.

The article said 71 per cent of teachers complained that noise inside their classrooms is problematic; and 35 percent of the teachers reported that they had to raise their voices to be heard, resulting in nodules developing on their vocal chords. The article went on to explain that children with hearing problems suffered more than others, but that even children with normal hearing did not experience the minimum standard for noise levels.

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Florida Flight School Too Noisy for Vero Beach Residents

PUBLICATION: Press Journal
DATE: April 17, 2000
SECTION: Indian River County; Pg. A7
DATELINE: Vero Beach, Florida

The Press Journal printed this op ed regarding aircraft noise from FlightSafety Academy in Vero Beach, Florida. The editorial is written in its entirety.

"The time is now. Citizens need to unite to show the major impact FlightSafety has on our community. Noise complaints are now logged 8:30 a.m.-5 p.m. Monday-Friday at 567-4526. Homeowners are only counted one time, even if they call daily.

The loud, constant and repetitious invasion to our homes by low-flying students (not trained and licensed pilots) has affected our daily lives. Neighbors report the rumble has been setting off their alarm systems!

Country Club Pointe has made numerous complaints; we have attended Airport Commission meetings, met with FlightSafety and had lengthy discussions about the ever-increasing noise and safety violations.

We followed protocol, but the problem of repetitious flight training has grown at an exponential rate. In May, FlightSafety is looking for approval to expand its operations from the City Council.

The city noise ordinances don't count with FlightSafety? Why is this business treated differently than Riverside Cafe? Its impact is not as far reaching as a flying object. Residents, please take this lone opportunity to demonstrate that the ninth busiest airport in the nation is stealing our ability to enjoy our homes. Simply be at City Council chambers at 7 p.m. Tuesday. I encourage you to speak under the public participation portion of the meeting. I will speak under Mayor's Matters and your presence will qualify us.

Our property value has no hope of escalating with this noise. Many are selling at a loss just to get some peace. This ever-increasing nuisance on our lives is getting very old and widespread. Please support the opposition to the ever-increasing squeeze that we all feel."

Nancy B. Wood

President

Country Club Pointe

Homeowners Association

Vero Beach

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Natural Sound Wall for City of Berkeley Needs State Approval

PUBLICATION: San Francisco Chronicle
DATE: APRIL 17, 2000
SECTION: News; Pg. A24
BYLINE: Debra Levi Holtz
DATELINE: Berkeley, California

According to the San Francisco Chronicle, the city of Berkeley designed a natural sound wall of flora and fauna along Interstate 80, and asked the state's transportation department to approve the special design.

The article said that the "wall's construction is steel-reinforced concrete beams, which are then laid across compacted soil in the pattern of railroad tracks." The design, according to the article, is to prevent the wall from falling in an earthquake.

The article said that the city has worked with a consulting firm for seven years to come up with a natural sound wall to shield a natural green space.

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Chicago is a Noisy City and Residents Suffer

PUBLICATION: Chicago Sun-Times
DATE: April 16, 2000
SECTION: Sunday News; Pg. 16
BYLINE: Bryan Smith
DATELINE: Chicago, Illinois

The Chicago-Times printed an editorial in the Sunday edition about the impact of noise from many different sources has on residents in the Chicago-area.

The editorial described different types of noises from 120 decibel-level jets in and out of O'Hare International Airport to trains (the elevated train called the "L"), buses and jackhammers.

The editorial acknowledged the city has long been noisy, but since the 1970s, a growth in population as well as an explosion in new sources of unwanted noise such as jet skis, leafblowers and cell phones. The article went on to explain that for many residents, summer is a noisier time because residents leave their windows open, if they are able to withstand the noise.

The editorial said that noise complaints increased by percent over a two-year period (Chicago Environment Department), while police issued five times the number of noise violation citations that they usually write. And statewide? The article said that the Illinois EPA caseload grew from 200 complaints in the 1980s to 3,000 in 1999.

The article said the world is the noisiest it's ever been, and in fact, is the number one complaint about city life, reiterating that the impact of more people is more noise--more leafblowers, more automobiles, more construction and so on.

The article stated that the "city code" reads that from 9pm to 8am, noise inside a home cannot exceed 55 decibels (dB).

Companies, and homeowners, can face fines and hearings.

The editorial explained that noise and overexposure to it has real physiological, psychological and biochemical impacts on our bodies.

In fact, the editorial says we are less likely to be considerate of each other and interferes with classroom lessons.

The editorial acknowledged that noise experts voice concern ver our lack of interest in noise and its impacts when such environmental issues as toxic waste confront us.

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Coping With Noise Involves Action

PUBLICATION: Chicago Sun-Times
DATE: April 16, 2000
SECTION: Sunday News; Pg. 17
DATELINE: Chicago, Illinois

The Chicago Sun-Times printed an article about resolving noise complaints. The article, while brief, listed steps to take to resolve the complaint. The article recommended first solving the problem by going to the source and conducting a reasonable discussion.

The article suggested documenting the problem when a discussion is not possible, measuring the noise with a noise-meter whenever possible and contacting various city departments: police, environment, mayor's office and so on, presenting ideas for revising the noise code if necessary pr forming an anti-noise group to get more clout.

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Modern Technology's Negative Impact: 50% Hearing Loss in Some People

PUBLICATION: Chicago Sun-Times
DATE: April 16, 2000
SECTION: Sunday News; Pg. 17
BYLINE: Michael Breen
DATELINE: Chicago, Illinois

According to the Chicago Sun-Times, today's modern society is hazardous to our hearing, and overexposure to loud noise can mean a permanent loss of hearing, affecting such known figures as Pete Townshend, Peter Frampton and President Clinton.

The article cited examples from Chicago's elevated train (the "L") to rock concerts. The article said that ten percent of the over 50 crowd can expect to get hearing aids soon and 25 percent will need hearing aids after age 65--but worse is in store for future generations--of today's teens, one in five suffer hearing loss.

The article gave tips on how to guard against hearing loss--from avoiding loud noises to wearing high-tech ear plugs to taking a multivitamin or vitamin B.

The article gave the following telephone number at a local clinic that provides a free, automated haring test: (847) 742-TEST.

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Ohio Town Writes New Noise Ordinance Because of Noisy Semi Trucks

PUBLICATION: Columbus Dispatch
DATE: April 16, 2000
SECTION: News, Pg. 3I
BYLINE: Tom Sheehan, Dispatch Staff Reporter
DATELINE: Delaware, Ohio

According to the Columbus Dispatch, truck traffic in downtown Delaware, Ohio has sparked a debate on whether anyone can do anything about the jarring noise, which can shake the mortar loose from the bricks.

Loud truck brakes are a primary source of complaint from semis traveling down Rts. 23 and 42 through downtown Delaware. Prompted by complaints from business owners, a new ordinance authorizes a $100 fine for such noisy brakes, but residents doubt whether any new laws will be enforceable.

The article said that New Jersey issued a ban on any tractor-trailer not on business in the city, but the American Trucking Association filed a lawsuit against the ban.

The article said that the 243 member cities of the Ohio Municipal League all have a similar noise ordinance against tractor-trailers, primarily because of citizen complaints, a growing trend over the past 20 years.

The article also mentioned the increasing use of loud car stereos as disturbing the peace.

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Compromises Help to Make Canadian Military Ships Quieter

PUBLICATION: Jane's Defence Upgrades
DATE: April 16, 2000
SECTION: Background Brief; Vol. 4; No. 8
BYLINE: Sharon Hobson
DATELINE: Canada

A report in Jane's Defence Upgrades states that after a three-year analysis of noise abatement to Canada's Halifax-class ships, a compromise solution may be the only solution.

The article explained that the analysis was "heavily censored" and claimed that the ships' effectiveness decreased with noise-abatement and increased vulnerability. The article said a team of experts studied "the effects of propeller modifications, mufflers, the Air Emission System (AES) and acoustic decoupling tiles."

The article said that about 12,500 synthetic rubber tiles affixed to the hull of the HMCS Montreal cost around $2 million (US), effectively reducing noise from the hull as well as radiated noise.

The article said that applying the tiles to the remaining ships in the class will cost about $20 million (US), and is a low priority.

The article explained the technical aspects of the ships, and emphasized that the inexpensive solution of reducing noise from the hulls won't bring the ships up to specification.

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NYC Night Shift Employees Too Noisy for Neighborhood

PUBLICATION: New York Times
DATE: April 16, 2000
SECTION: Section 14; Page 12; Column 3; The City Weekly Desk
BYLINE: by Tara Bahrampour
DATELINE: New York City

The New York Times reported that Metropolitan Transit third shift employees (11pm to 5am) are too noisy, and neighbors have organized to bring the problem to the company's attention.

According to the article, Ben Meskin, president of Care About the Slope community group have asked the Transit Authority to relocate employee check in, which he says is the real culprit.

MTA officials said they will attempt to quieten its employees, but would not relocate the check in point.

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Sacramento Airport Construction Delay Because of Noise and Safety Issues

PUBLICATION: Sacramento Bee
DATE: April 16, 2000
SECTION: Metro; Pg. B1
BYLINE: Robert D. Davila Bee Staff Writer
DATELINE: Sacrmento County, California

The Sacramento Bee reported that the increase of noise complaints and the crash of a cargo jet have resulted in an 18-month construction delay at Mather Airport. The article said county officials the opportunity to study the future of the up and coming air-freight hub.

The article said that one solution, extending a runway, would interfere with plans for an 823-acre residential development. The article added that air-freight operators are worried that restrictions will impede their business.

The article said that county officials are already suggesting ways to reduce conflict between residents and the airport such as sound proofing materials and disclosure to prospective homebuyers.

The article said that Mather received about 7,400 cargo flights in 1999 and 5,200 in 1994.

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Florida Airport Relocation Debate Gets Noisy

PUBLICATION: Stuart News/Port St. Lucie News
DATE: April 16, 2000
SECTION: A Section; Pg. A1
BYLINE: Melissa E. Holsman
DATELINE: Stuart, Florida

an article in the Stuart News/Port St. Lucie News reported that politics money and the proposed expansion of Witham Airport have accelerated greatly, and residents are calling for a vote on the issue in November and are organizing.

The article said that when county commissioners voted to limit aircraft weight, a private jet owner threatened to sue and the voters came together to challenge him.

a spokesperson and co-founder of Witham Airport Action Majority (WAAM) says the issue is not about a few against one jet owner, but rather to stop the increase in the number of flights into and out of Witham.

But according to the article, the jet owner says the group is against him because he's wealthy.

The article said that WAAM plans to endorse candidates for the November election.

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Noise Complaints Prompt North Carolinian to Write Letter

PUBLICATION: Sunday Star-News
DATE: April 16, 2000
SECTION: Editorial; Pg. 6E
DATELINE: Wilmington, North Carolina

The Sunday Star-News printed a letter to the editor from one person who says noise complaints should not be called in to the police, adding that downtown noise is part of downtown life. The letter is printed in its entirety.

Noise part of city

"EDITOR: I am writing about your April 12 article on downtown noise.

I am a former resident of downtown, 7 North Front Street. In the five years I lived downtown, I was often awakened at odd hours by noise. The noise, however, was not music. It was the ranting of the drunk and disorderly.

I got what I asked for. Downtown was convenient and fun, and the noise was part of it. I loved living downtown and I miss it. I for one say, "If you can't stand the heat, get out of the kitchen."

I am prompted to write because your article states that in response to loud music downtown, residents have "responded by phoning the police on a daily basis to complain."

I would like to suggest that the greater problems downtown are violent crime and vandalism and those who bombard the police department with what I consider nuisance calls may one day have to rudely recall the tale of the boy who called wolf.

I have no quarrel with those who don't like the noise, but I'd like to suggest that pestering the police department is not the way to deal with the problem."

JOHN D. (DAN) WALSH

Wilmington

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Previous week: April 9, 2000

Indexes

Indexes

Aircraft Noise
Amplified Noise
Effects on Wildlife/Animals
Construction Noise
Firing Ranges
Health Effects
Home Equipment and Appliances
Industrial/Manufacturing
International News
Environmental Justice
Land Use and Noise
Lawsuits
Civil Liberty Issues
Miscellaneous Noise Stories
Noise Ordinances
Noise Organizations Mentioned
Outdoor Events
Noise in Our National Parks/Natural Areas
Regulation
Residential and Community Noise
Snowmobile and ATV Noise
Research and Studies
Technological Solutions to Noise
Transportation Related Noise
Violence and Noise
Watercraft Noise
Workplace Noise

Chronological Index
Geographical Index

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